Announcing “Undergrads Doing History: Using Digital Primary Sources to Motivate Students” – An Upcoming Webinar by Prof. Carl Robert Keyes

banner top.JPG“How can I better incorporate my own research into the undergraduate courses I teach?”

College and university professors grapple with this question every semester.  In this 45-minute webinar, Prof. Keyes will reveal how he adapted two digital humanities projects—drawn from his own research on advertising in early America—into classroom exercises that challenge students to actively “do” history rather than merely learn about the past.

Register to attend this and learn how to:

• develop alternative assignments that engage student interest yet also enhance skills associated with traditional essays

• improve information literacy by identifying and assessing primary sources and secondary sources

• create research projects based on extensive collections of digital primary sources

• avoid pitfalls when developing digital humanities projects for undergraduate students

The webinar will conclude with an open Q & A session, and all registrants will receive a link to the recorded session.

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Thursday, Oct. 26, 2017 at 2:00 pm Eastern

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About the Presenter

Carl Robert Keyes Image for 2017 Webinar2.jpgCarl Robert Keyes is an associate professor of history at Assumption College in Worcester, Massachusetts. His research focuses on advertising and consumer culture in eighteenth-century America. He is currently writing a book tentatively titled Advertising in Early America: Marketing Media and Messages in the Eighteenth Century. His chapter on advertising in America prior to the Civil War will be included in the forthcoming Oxford History of Popular Print Culture. Keyes also publishes the two digital humanities projects featured in this presentation, the Adverts 250 Project and the Slavery Adverts 250 Project. He was elected to membership of the American Antiquarian Society in 2015

Twitter @Readex


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