David Loiterstein


About Author: 

David’s responsibilities include marketing strategy as well as advertising, promotion and publicity activities. In addition, he is the editor of the Readex Report, a quarterly e-newsletter featuring original articles by librarians and researchers on diverse aspects of digital historical collections and related topics.

Posts by this Author

Exotic China, Canadian Blacks and a Forgotten American War: The Readex Report (April 2016)

In this issue: The first American vessel to reach exotic China sparks nationwide wonder; nineteenth-century Canadian blacks find their voice in the American press; and an unheralded hero from a forgotten American war. 


The “New People” in China: Using Historical Newspapers to Analyze America’s First Contacts with Asia

By Dane Morrison, Professor of Early American History, Salem State University 

Exotic China, Canadian Blacks and a Forgotten American War: The Readex Report (April 2016)

Readex Report contributor T.J. Stiles wins 2016 Pulitzer Prize in History

[Editor’s note: This week the 2016 Pulitzer Prize in History was awarded to T. J. Stiles for “Custer’s Trials: A Life on the Frontier of a New America.” One of America’s most accomplished independent scholars, Stiles won the 2009 National Book Award in Nonfiction and the 2010 Pulitzer Prize in Biography for “The First Tycoon: The Epic Life of Cornelius Vanderbilt.” In this previously published Readex Report article, he discusses his use of the U.S. Congressional Serial Set—the single most important series of American government publications—for biographical research.] 


 Commodore Vanderbilt: Patriot or War Profiteer? 

By T.J. Stiles, author of Custer’s Trials, The First Tycoon, and Jessie James: Last Rebel of the Civil War 

Readex Report contributor T.J. Stiles wins 2016 Pulitzer Prize in History

Broadening History: A Conversation with Manisha Sinha (VIDEO)

Readex recently sat down with Manisha Sinha, Professor of Afro-American Studies at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. Sinha discussed her extensive new history of abolition and the importance of having access to broad digital collections. She also offered valuable advice to students beginning a research project of their own. 

For more information about The American Slavery Collection, Early American Newspapers or African American Newspapers, please contact readexmarketing@readex.com.

Broadening History: A Conversation with Manisha Sinha (VIDEO)

19th-Century Illustrations of African Americans by E.W. Kemble

Most famous for illustrating the first edition of Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (1884), Edward Winsor Kemble was highly regarded for his compassionate images of African Americans. Many of these illustrations can be found within Afro-Americana Imprints, 1535-1922: From the Library Company of Philadelphia. Below are a few examples of Kemble's artwork from a diverse selection of books published at the end of the 19th century:

From Our Phil and Other Stories (1889) by Katharine Floyd Dana, who published more widely under the pen name Olive A. Wadsworth:
 
19th-Century Illustrations of African Americans by E.W. Kemble

“Finding the Real Cuba”: A Special ALA Breakfast Presentation

On Sunday, June 29, 2014, during the American Library Association annual conference, Readex will host a special breakfast presentation on “Finding the Real Cuba: Citizen-Entrepreneurs and the Communist-Capitalist State Today.” An open discussion will follow the talk by Lillian Guerra, Ph.D., Professor of Cuban & Caribbean History, University of Florida, and winner of 2014 fellowships from both the American Council of Learned Societies and the Guggenheim Foundation.

“Finding the Real Cuba”: A Special ALA Breakfast Presentation

Nineteenth-Century Newspaper Editors Imagine the Twentieth-Century Newspaper

In 1895 editors at thirteen major American newspapers were asked to use their “prophetic powers” to forecast the news publishing world a century hence.

Over the previous decades, many of them had personally witnessed a host of “advancements in the art of newspaper making”: “from the Washington hand press to the perfecting press; from the stage coach to the telegraph; from paper at 10 cents to good paper at 2 cents a pound; from handset to marvelous typesetting machines…”

In this full-page article found in America’s Historical Newspapers, each of those prominent journalists “draw aside the curtain and peer into the future” to imagine the newspaper of 1995.

Here are excerpts from their predictions published nearly 120 years ago.

Nineteenth-Century Newspaper Editors Imagine the Twentieth-Century Newspaper

Afro-Americana Imprints in the Classroom: A Special Issue of The Readex Report (April 2014)

In this issue: A professor challenges her graduate students to craft historical narratives fueled by discoveries within Afro-Americana Imprints; their inspired articles reveal the potent research potential of a unique resource.

Dirty Searching and Roundabout Paths: Using Afro-Americana Imprints, 1535-1922, in a Master’s Level Seminar
By Susanna Ashton, Professor, American Literature, Clemson University

Would you consider sealing your next envelope with a sticker that read: “Be not partakers in other men’s sins.” More pointedly if you received such a missive, by ripping the seal would you be endorsing or decrying the maxim? I’m not sure, myself. But I was glad to learn about and see the page of gummed Abolitionist labels that my student placed within the discourse of indulgence and sin during the nineteenth century.

Afro-Americana Imprints in the Classroom: A Special Issue of The Readex Report (April 2014)

Just published—The Readex Report: February 2014

IN THIS ISSUE: A stirring look at an iconic abolitionist, the triumphant return of a renowned revolutionary, and a dead poet transmits verses via a mendacious medium.

The Life and Times of Frederick Douglass in Anacostia (Washington, D.C.) as told in the Washington Evening Star
By John Muller, author of Frederick Douglass in Washington, D.C.: The Lion of Anacostia

Just published—The Readex Report: February 2014

Celebrating African American History Month: Five Acclaimed Research and Teaching Collections for African American Studies

In 1925 Carter G. Woodson and his Association for the Study of Negro Life and History created Negro History Week. A half century later, during the U.S. bicentennial, this formal period for recognizing African American contributions to our national history was expanded to a month. At that time President Gerald Ford asked Americans to “seize the opportunity to honor the too-often neglected accomplishments of black Americans in every area of endeavor throughout our history.” During this 2014 celebration of African American History month, Readex is pleased to highlight these five new and recent resources:

The American Slavery Collection, 1820-1922: From the American Antiquarian Society

Celebrating African American History Month: Five Acclaimed Research and Teaching Collections for African American Studies

Attend a Webinar on African American Studies

Readex will offer a live webinar on Thursday, Feb. 20, 2014, for librarians, faculty and students who have an interest in African American studies.

This in-depth session will explore the content, features and functionality of three acclaimed Archive of Americana collections:

Afro-Americana Imprints, 1535-1922: From the Library Company of Philadelphia
African American Newspapers, 1827-1998
African American Periodicals, 1825-1995

Attend a Webinar on African American Studies

Pages


Back to top