Newest Issue of The Readex Report Now Available: November 2010

<strong>In <a href="http://www.readex.com/readex/newsletters.cfm?newsletter=161">this issue</a>:</strong> how digitized newspapers shine a brilliant light on past lives; the profound impact of religion on African-American identity; the Boston Tea Party as perceived by both Colonialists and those loyal to the Crown; and the humor, hype and horror behind the mysterious minced pie.<!--more--> <strong><a href="http://www.readex.com/readex/newsletters.cfm?newsletter=161&amp;article=...{"type":"media", "view_mode":"media_large", "fid":"3248", "attributes":{"class":"media-image alignleft size-full wp-image-1553", "typeof":"foaf:Image", "style":"", "width":"100", "height":"100", "alt":""}}]]A Light on Past Lives</a>: The Illuminating Effects of Electronic Resources on Biographical Research</strong><em> </em>By James McGrath Morris, author of <em>Pulitzer: A Life in Politics, Print, and Power </em>(HarperCollins, 2010) <strong><a href="http://www.readex.com/readex/newsletters.cfm?newsletter=161&amp;article=...{"type":"media", "view_mode":"media_large", "fid":"3247", "attributes":{"class":"media-image size-full wp-image-1552 alignright", "typeof":"foaf:Image", "style":"", "width":"100", "height":"100", "alt":""}}]]American Mystery Meat</a>: Unriddling the Mince Pie</strong> <em> </em>By Clifford J. Doerksen, author of <em>American Babel: Rogue Radio Broadcasters of the Jazz Age</em> (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2005)
Newest Issue of The Readex Report Now Available: November 2010

Searching for Ancient Dead in the Modern Age

<p style="text-align: center"><em><strong>Our guest blogger today is</strong></em><em><strong> </strong></em><strong>SJ Wolfe, Senior Cataloguer at the American Antiquarian Society and Independent Mummyologist</strong> </p> <div style="width: 302px;float:right;"><a href="/sites/default/files/wp-content/uploads/2010/11/Padi-and-me-2-CUT1.jpg"></a><p>SJ Wolfe and 19th-century mummy Padihershef </p></div> When I began my project ten years ago I was told I would find about 350 mummies. After looking through literally thousands of digital newspaper articles and recording the finds in my own database, I am pleased to report that as of October 2010 I have found 1,534 mummy-related articles representing about 850 individuals. Many of these mummies are mentioned in passing and would not have been found without <em><a href="http://www.readex.com/readex/index.cfm?content=96">America's Historical Newspapers</a></em>. As more titles get digitized, I discover not only more information about mummies I have already identified, but also new individuals.
Searching for Ancient Dead in the Modern Age

Meddlesome Medals?

What do the following seven people have in common: Osagyefo Kwame Nkrumah, Peter Ayodele Curtis Joseph, Modibo Keita, Shafie Ahmed el-Sheikh, Samora Machel, Agostinho Neto, Sam Nujoma and Nelson Mandela?  Well surely many things indeed.  For example, if you said they were all important African leaders in the second half of the twentieth century, you would be correct.  Each, however, in addition to any other commonalities, received the Lenin Peace Prize—the Soviet Union’s counterpart to the Nobel Peace Prize. Articles and radio broadcasts monitored, translated, and published in the <a href="http://www.readex.com/readex/index.cfm?content=370">Foreign Broadcast Information Service (FBIS) Daily Reports</a> discuss the Lenin Peace Prize awards.  By searching on the phrase “Lenin Peace Prize” and limiting results to items from Africa, one gets 22 results in the Readex digital edition of <em><a href="http://www.readex.com/readex/product.cfm?product=304">FBIS Daily Reports and Annexes, 1941-1996</a></em>. Searching for “Lenin Peace Prize” in the Readex database without limiting results by location retrieves some 268 results. Here is one example from the Accra Ghana Domestic Service on how the award was perceived in that country in 1962.
Meddlesome Medals?

Ships Ahoy! They don't make ships like this anymore

<div style="width: 310px;float:right;"><a href="/sites/default/files/wp-content/uploads/2010/11/JW-Constitution-launch-Article-1.jpg"></a><p>From America&#39;s Historical Newspapers</p></div> Contrary to this newspaper report that the event would take place in November 1797, the frigate USS Constitution was actually christened and launched at Boston’s naval shipyards the previous month on October 21—213 years ago this fall. During the course of the next two weeks in 1797, a number of newspapers wrote or republished articles about the launching, including the <em>Norwich Packet</em>: <p style="text-align: center"> <p style="text-align: center"> <div style="width: 291px;display:block;margin:0 auto;"><a href="/sites/default/files/wp-content/uploads/2010/11/JW-Constitution-Packet-Article-2.pdf">
Ships Ahoy! They don't make ships like this anymore

The Short-Lived Republic of West Florida: A Tale of Deception and Intrigue

<div style="width: 310px;float:right;"><a href="/sites/default/files/wp-content/uploads/2010/11/M010802.jpg"></a><p>Map Credit: Courtesy of the Special Collections Department, University of South Florida. Digitization provided by the USF Libraries Digitization Center.</p></div> This year marks the 200th anniversary of the Republic of West Florida, which existed from September 23 to December 10, 1810. The history of West Florida is a tale of deception and intrigue. The territory changed hands frequently, passing from France to Great Britain and then to Spain. Spain hoped to encourage settlement in West Florida and offered huge grants of land to immigrants. West Florida soon became home to an eclectic mix of settlers and scoundrels. Colonists who had opposed the American Revolution found sanctuary in West Florida. So did American land speculators, criminals and army deserters. Although the population was largely Anglo-American, West Florida remained loyal to Spain. In 1804, the inhabitants of West Florida had helped to quell an uprising instigated by three American brothers. <div style="width: 310px;float:left;"><a href="/sites/default/files/wp-content/uploads/2010/11/Hunt-West-Florida-1-Carthage-Gazette-10.19.1810.pdf">
The Short-Lived Republic of West Florida: A Tale of Deception and Intrigue

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