Baseball in America: Its Origins and Early Days

<p style="text-align: left">Some things never change, or so suggested the <em>Duluth News Tribune</em> in 1916:</p> <p style="text-align: center"><strong><a href="/sites/default/files/wp-content/uploads/2011/06/BB1Darwin.pdf" target="”_blank”"></a></strong></p> The origins of America’s national pastime are murky to say the least. How- ever, the contest now recognized as the first officially recorded baseball game in U.S. history took place 165 years ago on June 19, 1846. One thing we know for certain about baseball’s origins is it was not invented by Abner Doubleday in Cooperstown, New York in 1839. The beginnings of baseball are more likely found in earlier games such as rounders, town ball, and old cat. The latter is described in a 1905 <em>Baltimore American</em> article. <p style="text-align: center"><a href="/sites/default/files/wp-content/uploads/2011/06/BB2Origins.pdf" target="”_blank”">
Baseball in America: Its Origins and Early Days

Top-Ten Articles Published in The Readex Report

<em><a href="http://www.readex.com/readex/newsletters.cfm?newsletter=171">[[{"type":"media", "view_mode":"media_large", "fid":"3523", "attributes":{"class":"media-image alignright size-full wp-image-2913", "typeof":"foaf:Image", "style":"", "width":"146", "height":"249", "alt":""}}]]</a><a href="http://www.readex.com/readex/newsletters.cfm" target="”_blank”">The Readex Report</a> </em>is a quarterly e-newsletter that explores diverse aspects of both modern librarianship and digital historical collections. Through original articles by academic faculty and librarians, <em>The Readex Report </em>provides insights on topics as wide-ranging as those found in the following list of the most clicked-upon articles published since 2006. <a href="http://www.readex.com/readex/newsletters.cfm?newsletter=95&amp;article=9... the Library in the Digital Age</a> <p style="padding-left: 30px">By Benjamin L. Carp, Assistant Professor of History, Tufts University [<em>Volume 4, Issue 4</em>]</p> <a href="http://www.readex.com/readex/newsletters.cfm?newsletter=22&amp;article=2... or Muscle? The Library in the Digital Age</a> <p style="padding-left: 30px">By Edward Shephard, State University of New York, Binghamton [<em>Volume 4, Issue 3</em>]</p>
Top-Ten Articles Published in The Readex Report

Just Browsing: Cool Items from the Past

One of the joys of browsing American historical newspapers is discovering the unexpected from around the world. Take this photograph, for example, of a car being dragged across a Siberian river during the Peking-to-Paris race in 1907: <p style="text-align: center"> <div style="width: 510px;display:block;margin:0 auto;"><a href="/sites/default/files/wp-content/uploads/2011/06/Russians-pulling-car.pdf" target="”_blank”"></a><p>Source: Cleveland Plain Dealer; Date: Aug. 18, 1907; Page: 29</p></div> Or this photo of European ostrich racing in the 1920s: <div style="width: 460px;display:block;margin:0 auto;"><a href="/sites/default/files/wp-content/uploads/2011/06/Unexpected-Plain-Dealer-09281924.jpg" target="”_blank”"></a><p>Source: Cleveland Plain Dealer, Date: Sept. 28, 1924; Page 76</p></div>
Just Browsing: Cool Items from the Past

"A Dastardly Outrage": Kate Brown and the Washington-Alexandria Railroad Case

<p><strong>[Kate Brown, a U.S. Senate laundress promoted to retiring room attendant, is most notable for winning the 1873 Supreme Court Case <em>Railroad Company v. Brown</em>. This spring Brown was the focus of a <a href="http://blog.oup.com/2011/06/kate-brown/">winning entry</a> in a <a href="http://blog.oup.com/2011/06/gilder-lehrman/">research competition</a> sponsored by the <a href="http://www.oxfordaasc.com/public/books/t0001/index.jsp">Oxford African American Studies Center</a> and the <a href="http://www.gilderlehrman.org/">Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History</a>. That <a href="http://blog.oup.com/2011/06/kate-brown/">winning entry</a> on Brown, which will be published in the online <em>African American National Biography</em>, was researched and written by McLean (VA) High School students Brian Tong and Theodore Lin, who utilized the <em><a href="http://readex.com/content/us-congressional-serial-set-1817-1994">U.S. Congressional Serial&nbsp;Set</a></em> among other sources.&nbsp;The article on Kate Brown below was written by Betty K. Koed, Assistant Historian in the U.S. Senate Historical Office.
"A Dastardly Outrage": Kate Brown and the Washington-Alexandria Railroad Case

You are what you eat? Maybe, maybe not

<div style="width: 310px;float:right;"><a href="/sites/default/files/wp-content/uploads/2011/06/Morning-Oregonian-Date-02.05.1910.pdf" target="”_blank”"></a><p>Source: Morning Oregonian, Feb. 5, 1910</p></div> Low-fat? Low-calorie? Low-carb? Headlines seem to grab the public’s interest every day with warnings about what and what not to eat. With food-related health issues and rising obesity rates getting so much attention in the United States and around the world, it is tempting to think that mankind’s struggles with diet are new. But of course they aren’t! <a href="/sites/default/files/wp-content/uploads/2011/06/rising_son_05261905.jpg" target="”_blank”"></a> <div style="width: 269px;float:left;"><a href="/sites/default/files/wp-content/uploads/2011/06/rising_son_05261905.pdf">
You are what you eat? Maybe, maybe not

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