Hello, Comrade Philby

Kim Philby on USSR commemorative stamp

In “Just Browsing: Cool Items from the Past,” I shared several unexpected items I recently stumbled upon in America’s Historical Newspapers. I don’t however expect to find such wonderful things in Foreign Broadcast Information Service Daily Reports. What’s cool there comes more from the benefits of hindsight than sheer surprise. And that backward look lets the propagandistic nature of some of the documents shine through. One I recently read is the somewhat hagiographic interview with Kim Philby, the former high-ranking member of British intelligence agent who spied for and later defected to the Soviet Union. The interview, first published in the Russian daily newspaper Izvestiya on Dec. 19, 1967, was translated into English for publication in FBIS supplement “MATERIALS ON 50TH ANNIVERSARY OF SOVIET STATE SECURITY ORGANS, FBIS-FRB-68-007-S on 1968-01-10. Supplement number 2” Titled “Hello, Comrade Philby,” the article starts with a street scene in chilly Moscow:

Hello, Comrade Philby

Announcing a Readex Online Seminar: Newspaper Archives for Academic Research and Teaching

Readex now offers complimentary 45-minute Webinars led by experts in the history and academic use of newspaper archives. We invite you and your colleagues to register for a lively fall session in which you’ll learn about the fascinating and unique histories of a series of major American newspapers.

We’ll also explore such topics as:

Announcing a Readex Online Seminar: Newspaper Archives for Academic Research and Teaching

Cutting-edge Biographers, Corporate Crimes, Seductive Cards and a Deadly Sport in the new Readex Report

In our latest issue: A recent New York Times op-ed posits digitized newspapers have "the potential to revolutionize biographical research"; digital archives expose corrupt corporate governance across history; how sailing cards leveraged an idealized picture of manhood and masculinity; and the lethal legacy of an ephemeral American sport—plus three featured posts from this blog.

The Biographer's New Best Friend

From The New York Times Sunday Review (Sept. 11, 2011) By Stephen MihmAssociate Professor of History, University of Georgia  

Cutting-edge Biographers, Corporate Crimes, Seductive Cards and a Deadly Sport in the new Readex Report

Celebrating National Hispanic Heritage Month: Hispanic American Newspapers, 1808-1980

 

 

Title: Native dance by Spanish-American. Fiesta, Taos, New Mexico. Photographer: Russell Lee (1903-1986). Source: Farm Security Administration - Office of War Information Photograph Collection (Library of Congress)

National Hispanic Heritage Month—approved by President Lyndon Johnson and expanded in 1988 by President Ronald Reagan—runs from September 15 to October 15. In addition to providing a special opportunity to celebrate Hispanic culture, Hispanic Heritage Month serves to highlight the long and important presence of Hispanic Americans in North America.

Celebrating National Hispanic Heritage Month: Hispanic American Newspapers, 1808-1980

Now online: African American Periodicals - from slavery to the modern era

African American Periodicals, 1825-1995

The essential new complement to African American Newspapers, 1827-1998

African American Periodicals, 1825-1995 features more than 170 wide-ranging periodicals by and about African Americans. Published in 26 states, the publications include academic and political journals, commercial magazines, institutional newsletters, organizations' bulletins, annual reports and other genres.

Now online: African American Periodicals - from slavery to the modern era

Religion and the Rise of the Second Ku Klux Klan, 1915-1922 (by Kelly J. Baker)

[This article by Kelly J. Baker, who currently teaches American and religious studies at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, first appeared in the September 2009 issue of The Readex Report. Baker is also an editor of the Religion in American History blog. Her first book, Gospel According to the Klan: The KKK’s Appeal to Protestant America, 1915–1930, is being published this month by the University Press of Kansas.]

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“An original and sobering work” -- David Morgan, author of Protestants and Pictures

Religion and the Rise of the Second Ku Klux Klan, 1915-1922 (by Kelly J. Baker)

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