Washington, D.C.'s "Paper of Record" — The Evening Star, 1852-1981

Having successfully located and digitized almost all of the American newspapers published during the 17th and 18th <a href="http://www.readex.com/readex/product.cfm?product=384" target="_blank"></a>centuries, Readex is now focusing on 19th and 20th century newspapers. Guided by our academic advisors and our library customers, we are trying to add the most important papers first, and the Washington <em><a href="http://www.readex.com/readex/product.cfm?product=384" target="_blank">Evening Star</a></em> is a good example. Though it closed in 1981, from its founding the <em>Star</em> was one of the most influential newspapers in the country, and by World War I it was the "paper of record" in the nation’s capital. For historians of the 20th century, the <em>Star</em> offers an unparalleled look at the intricate workings of government, as noted by these two authors:  <blockquote><a href="http://books.wwnorton.com/books/Nixons-Shadow/" target="_blank">
Washington, D.C.'s "Paper of Record" — The Evening Star, 1852-1981

The Benefits of Browsing: Comments from Erin Cassidy, Sam Houston State University

<div style="width: 104px;float:left;"><a href="http://shsulibraryguides.org/profile.php?uid=25150" target="_blank"></a><p>Erin Cassidy</p></div> We recently received a short note from Erin Cassidy, Assistant Professor, Web Services Librarian, and History and Foreign Languages Bibliographer in the Newton Gresham Library of Sam Houston State University. Drawing on her experience providing library instruction to students, she offered these thoughts on the Readex interface, which we share here with her permission: <blockquote>One of the most valuable features of the Readex interface is its entirely unique browsing capability. I often assist undergraduate students who aren’t yet sure of their exact research question or thesis, and many of whom are entirely new to the idea of conducting research with historical documents. It can be difficult for students in this situation to build precise searches, but the Readex tools for browsing by characteristics like subjects, genres, people, events, geography, and so forth provide them with a powerful alternative to searching. <a href="http://www.readex.com/readex/index.cfm?content=94" target="_blank">
The Benefits of Browsing: Comments from Erin Cassidy, Sam Houston State University

Attend a Webinar on Open-Source Intelligence (FBIS and JPRS)

<p style="text-align: left;"><a href="http://www.readex.com/readex/index.cfm?content=447" target="_blank">
Attend a Webinar on Open-Source Intelligence (FBIS and JPRS)

Digitization of the Washington Evening Star, 1852-1981: Comments from Researchers

<div style="width: 310px;float:right;"><a href="http://www.readex.com/readex/product.cfm?product=384" target="_blank"></a><p>From the Readex digital edition</p></div> Following the recent news that Readex is now offering institutions access to the complete historical run of the Washington <em><a href="http://www.readex.com/readex/product.cfm?product=384" target="_blank">Evening Star</a>,</em> here are comments from two leading researchers<em> </em>familiar with this influential newspaper. <a href="https://historypress.net/catalogue/bookstore/books/Frederick-Douglass-in... target="_blank">
Digitization of the Washington Evening Star, 1852-1981: Comments from Researchers

Freedom Bound: The Sesquicentennial of the Emancipation Proclamation

<h3 style="text-align: center"><span style="font-family: Arial">By Erica Armstrong Dunbar, Associate Professor of History, University of Delaware, and Director of the Program in African American History, Library Company of Philadelphia</span></h3> <span style="font-family: Arial"><a href="http://yalepress.yale.edu/yupbooks/book.asp?isbn=9780300125917" target="_blank"></a>In 2013, people across the United States will celebrate the sesquicentennial of the signing of the Emancipation Proclamation. As the country approached a third year of bloody civil war, President Abraham Lincoln issued what has become the most symbolic of mandates. Although limited in many ways, the Proclamation stands as a centerpiece in the long struggle to end racial slavery in America, an institution that spanned more than two centuries and brought death and despair to millions of people of African descent. </span>
Freedom Bound: The Sesquicentennial of the Emancipation Proclamation

New Webinars: Historical Perspectives on the American South, West and Northeast

<h3 align="center"><a href="http://www.readex.com/readex/index.cfm?content=445" target="_blank"><strong>Newspaper Archives for Academic Research and Training: </strong><strong>A Series of Three Regionally Focused Webinars</strong></a></h3> American newspapers—with their eyewitness reporting, editorials, advertisements, obituaries and human interest stories—have preserved essential records and detailed accounts of nearly every facet of regional and national life. Now searchable online, these regionally diverse newspaper archives span centuries of social, cultural, political, military, business, sports and literary history, providing students and scholars with invaluable original reporting and fresh, local-level insights. <h3 style="text-align: center"><strong><a href="http://www.readex.com/readex/index.cfm?content=445" target="_blank">Newspaper Archives of the American Northeast</a> </strong></h3> <h4 align="center">Thursday, October 18 -- 1 to 2 pm EST</h4> Newspaper publishing in New England and the Mid-Atlantic stateshas had a long and proud history, going back to the colonial era. In this webinar we’ll explore the rich histories of prominent newspapers such as the <em>Boston</em><em> Herald, New York Tribune, Philadelphia Inquirer, Springfield Republican, Trenton Evening Times, Washington Evening Star</em> and others. <h3 align="center"><strong><a href="http://www.readex.com/readex/index.cfm?content=445" target="_blank">Newspaper Archives of the American South</a></strong></h3> <h4 align="center">Thursday, October 25 -- 1 to 2 pm EST</h4>
New Webinars: Historical Perspectives on the American South, West and Northeast

The Index of Virginia Printing: Building an Online Reference with Print and Digital Resources

<h3 style="text-align: center"><strong>Our Guest Blogger is David A. Rawson, Ph.D., Historian &amp; Professor, Worcester, Massachusetts</strong></h3> How does a researcher handle dated reference works still in print and still widely used? <div style="width: 368px;float:right;"><p>From the masthead of a Virginia newspaper</p></div> <p style="text-align: left">This has been a recurring challenge in my twenty years of research into Virginia's early printing trade. Historians of the Old Dominion have long repeated the assertions of their predecessors with a certain reverence for their closer proximity to the historical past, and so of their forebears' intrinsic authority. Names like Lyon G. Tyler, Earle Gregg Swem, William G. Stanard, and Lester J. Cappon carry considerable authority among Virginia's historians, just as those of Charles Evans, Clarence Brigham, Roger P. Bristol, and Winifred Gregory do among bibliographers of early American imprints and newspapers. Their works are magisterial efforts from a time when the now-common computerized collecting and sorting of bibliographic and biographic data was not just unknown, it was unfathomable.</p> <div style="width: 310px;float:left;">
The Index of Virginia Printing: Building an Online Reference with Print and Digital Resources

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