The Story of “Back Number” Budd, Legendary Used Newspaper Salesman

<p><a href="https://global.oup.com/academic/product/writing-with-scissors-9780199927...{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_large","fid":"4332","attributes":{"alt":"","class":"media-image alignright size-full wp-image-6177","height":"300","typeof":"foaf:Image","width":"300"}}]]</a>In <em><a href="http://www.oup.com/us/catalog/general/subject/LiteratureEnglish/?view=us... target="_blank">Writing with Scissors</a>: American Scrapbooks from the Civil War to the Harlem Renaissance, </em><a href="http://scrapbookhistory.wordpress.com/" target="_blank">Ellen Gruber Garvey, Ph.D.</a> (Professor, English Department, New Jersey City University) includes a section on Robert M. Budd, an African American dealer in old newspapers. Her book discusses newspaper clipping scrapbooks as the ancestors to social networking sites like Facebook and to digitized information. If you are in Western Massachusetts, don't miss her <a href="http://scrapbookhistory.wordpress.com/2012/11/21/scrapbook-history-talks... target="_blank">lectures</a> this week at Hampshire College and the University of Massachusetts, Amherst.&nbsp; In a forthcoming article in <em>The Readex Report</em>, Prof. Garvey will discuss Robert Budd’s business as a step along the way to the way we understand information now.
The Story of “Back Number” Budd, Legendary Used Newspaper Salesman

Just published — The Readex Report: November 2012

<a href="http://www.readex.com/readex/newsletters.cfm?newsletter=199" target="_blank">In this issue</a>: Using colonial American texts to challenge and captivate students; the triumphs and tragedy of a black cycling superstar; fleshing out the lives of early American felons; and moneymaking mummies of the nineteenth century. <strong><a href="http://www.readex.com/readex/newsletters.cfm?newsletter=199&amp;article=... target="_blank">Student Scholars: Using <em>Early American Imprints</em> to Introduce Students to the Era and to the Field</a></strong>  By Julie R. Voss, <em>Assistant Professor of English, Coordinator of American Studies Program, Lenoir-Rhyne University</em>  <blockquote><a href="http://www.readex.com/readex/newsletters.cfm?newsletter=199&amp;article=... target="_blank">
Just published — The Readex Report: November 2012

Here there be monsters, OR The Gloucester Serpent!

<p style="text-align: center;"></p> <h5 style="text-align: center;">“Report of a committee of the Linnæan Society of New England relative to a large marine animal, supposed to be a serpent, seen near Cape Ann, Massachusetts, in August, 1817.” From Early American Imprints, Series II.</h5> <p>Upon opening your copy of <em>The Salem Gazette</em> on New Year’s Day, 1818, your continued patronage would have been solicited with a page in verse which included the following:</p> <blockquote> <div style="width: 183px; float: right;"><a href="/sites/default/files/wp-content/uploads/2012/10/Salem-Gazette-Jan-1-1818.pdf" target="_blank"></a> <p>Salem Gazette, Supplement; January 1, 1818. Click to open. (From America’s Historical Newspapers)</p> </div>
Here there be monsters, OR The Gloucester Serpent!

Back to top