Happy 80th Anniversary to the Drive-In Theater

<p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size: 9.0pt; font-family: Georgia; mso-bidi-font-family: Arial;" data-mce-mark="1">The first "drive-in theater" opened on June 6, 1933, just outside of </span>Camden, New Jersey. &nbsp;The news was covered around the country.<span style="font-size: 9.0pt; font-family: Georgia; mso-bidi-font-family: Arial;" data-mce-mark="1"><br /></span></p><p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size: 9.0pt; font-family: Georgia; mso-bidi-font-family: Arial;" data-mce-mark="1">
Happy 80th Anniversary to the Drive-In Theater

Uncle Tom’s Cabin: First Published Serially in The National Era (June 1851)

<p></p><p style="text-align: left;"><span style="font-size: 9pt;">B</span><span style="font-size: 9pt;">efore Harriet Beecher Stowe’s anti-slavery novel appeared in book form in March 1852, it was published as a serial in</span><span style="font-size: 9pt;">&nbsp;</span><em style="font-size: 9pt;">The National Era</em><span style="font-size: 9pt;">, an abolitionist newspaper printed weekly in the</span><span style="font-size: 9pt;">&nbsp;nation’s capital. The first installment appeared this week in 1851 on the paper’s front page, beginning in the top left column:</span></p><p><a href="http://www.readex.com/sites/default/files/National%20Era%20June%205%2018... target="_blank"><span style="font-size: 9pt;">
Uncle Tom’s Cabin: First Published Serially in The National Era (June 1851)

Ascending the World’s Tallest Mountain: The View from America’s Historical Newspapers and the World Newspaper Archive

<p>Ascents of Everest are now so numerous they often don’t make the news anymore, unless there is a devastating loss of life, a brawl among Sherpas and climbers or a race between octogenarians to become the mountain’s oldest successful climber. Yet from early attempts in the 1920s until the triumphant expedition in 1953, attempts at Everest were widely covered. The exotic nature of the quest meant that newspapers could combine graphics and photography in the layout of their pages, as will be seen in the articles below.<span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 9pt;">&nbsp;</span></p><p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;">Everest was named after a former British colonial official, though the mountain had local names, including the Tibetan Chomolunga. Since both Nepal and Tibet had closed their borders to foreigners, the British didn’t know the native names. They did know it was the tallest mountain in the Himalayas, from surveying it from afar, and the tallest in the world. They also knew that only a highly organized team could conquer it.
Ascending the World’s Tallest Mountain: The View from America’s Historical Newspapers and the World Newspaper Archive

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