Just published—The Readex Report: November 2013

IN THIS ISSUE: A pensive primer on the teaching of history research classes, a mysterious presidential embargo exemption sparks envy and anger, and a gifted group of Chinese students succumbs to Western ways.

Librarians and History Instruction: Getting the Most Out of the One-shot Session
By Alexandra Simons, History, Political Science, and Government Documents Librarian, University of Houston

Just published—The Readex Report: November 2013

African American Print Culture: A Conversation with James Danky

Last month Kim Gallon, founder and director of the Black Press Research Collective (BPRC) and assistant professor of history at Muhlenberg College, interviewed James Danky, editor of African-American Newspapers and Periodicals: A National Bibliography and cofounder of the Center for the History of Print Culture.

Among the topics discussed in their half-hour conversation are the alternative press; the research value of African American serials; the University of Wisconsin’s collection of black newspapers and periodicals; Danky’s effort to create a national bibliography; its transformation of research capabilities in African American studies and related fields; the two Readex digital collections based upon Danky’s work; and many others.

 

 

Today more than 200 academic institutions of every type and size are providing access to either African American Newspapers, 1827-1998, or African American Periodicals, 1825-1995, or both. To request a trial for your institution, please contact readexmarketing@readex.com.

African American Print Culture: A Conversation with James Danky

November News History: A Short Quiz

This month we offer a short news quiz, which focuses on five historical events that took place between 1811 and 1922, all during the month of November.

Can you answer four or more of these five multiple-choice questions correctly and get a passing grade? All of the answers can be found in America's Historical Newspapers, as can be seen upon completion.

Try the Readex quiz today.  

November News History: A Short Quiz

Eyewitness Accounts of President Kennedy’s Assassination: A Look Back after 50 Years

In Dallas, Texas, on Nov. 22, 1963, one undisputed fact occurred: President John F. Kennedy was assassinated while riding in a motorcade with his wife Jacqueline, Texas Governor John Connally, and his wife Nellie. Beyond that almost every detail is disputed, and Kennedy’s assassination remains the subject of vigorous debate, with many competing conspiracy theories.

Did Lee Harvey Oswald actually kill the president, even though he denied it before Jack Ruby in turn murdered him? Was Oswald a lone assassin, as the official government-sponsored Warren Commission concluded after a 10-month investigation? Were there three shots or four? Did all the shots come from the Texas Book Depository, or did at least one shot come from a grassy knoll on the north side of Elm Street? If the killing was a conspiracy, who was involved? The questions, and the speculation, are endless, and now at the half century mark it looks like we may never know the whole story.

The Dallas Morning News thoroughly covered the Kennedy assassination. After all, it was a major story happening in their own city, and one of their correspondents was chosen to be one of the four reporters allowed to travel in the presidential motorcade that fateful day. The News printed that reporter’s eyewitness account of the assassination, as well as an eyewitness account from another staff reporter who was standing on the infamous grassy knoll at the time the shots rang out.

Eyewitness Accounts of President Kennedy’s Assassination: A Look Back after 50 Years

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