Black Studies Papers Launched with First Special Issue: Slavery Revisited

Black Studies Papers Launched with First Special Issue: Slavery Revisited

Editors: Dr. Carsten Junker and Dr. Marie-Luise Löffler, University of Bremen

Black Studies Papers Launched with First Special Issue: Slavery Revisited

Colored Conventions in the Nineteenth Century and the Digital Age: Call for Papers

CFP: Colored Conventions in the Nineteenth Century and the Digital Age

University of Delaware and the Delaware Historical Society, April 24-26, 2015

Colored Conventions in the Nineteenth Century and the Digital Age: Call for Papers

Tales of Travel and Adventure: Selected Highlights from Afro-Americana Imprints, 1535-1922

The May release of Afro-Americana Imprints, 1535-1922: From the Library Company of Philadelphia includes several works that provide an outsider’s perspective on subjects ranging from 17th-century Spanish rule of the New World to mid-19th century American life to the slave trade as seen by an unsuspecting sailor.

The English-American his Travail by Sea and Land: or, A New Survey of the West-India's, Containing a Journall of Three Thousand and Three Hundred Miles within the Main Land of America (1648)
By Thomas Gage

Published more than 350 years ago, Thomas Gage’s description of the New World is the first English-language work of its kind. Although Gage included important information about the language and customs of indigenous people, his primary objective was convincing Oliver Cromwell to invade Spanish America. In addition to using the brutality of Spanish rulers as a moral justification for invasion, Gage provided a perhaps more persuasive economic incentive. A poem included in the preface concludes with these lines:

To Lands inrich’d with gold, with pearls and gems,
But above all, where many thousands stay
Of wronged Indians, whom you shall set free
From Spanish yoke, and Rome’s idolatry.

Tales of Travel and Adventure: Selected Highlights from Afro-Americana Imprints, 1535-1922

“Flying to be Free”: Highlights from The American Slavery Collection

The May release of The American Slavery Collection, 1820-1922: From the American Antiquarian Society features several items offering a diverse set of abolitionist arguments. These range from appeals to faith, to the Declaration of Independence, and to the overall framework of American government. Among the other items in this month’s release are a rare collection of anti-slavery songs for the harp and—perhaps rarer—a call for compromise in American politics.

Slavery in America: A Reprint of an Appeal to the Christian Women of the Slave States of America (1837)
By Angelina E. Grimké 
“Flying to be Free”: Highlights from The American Slavery Collection

Children and War: Selected Highlights from The American Civil War Collection

The American Civil War Collection, 1860-1922, contains many items published for children during the war as well as many items pertaining to the role of children in the war. Here are five examples from the May release of this new resource, created from the American Antiquarian Society's comprehensive holdings of Civil War materials. 

Charlie the Drummer-Boy (1861)
By Sarah Schoonmaker Baker

This 16-page pamphlet presents a remarkably light-hearted narrative poem about the courage and faith of a drummer boy who, although badly injured, provided comfort to a wounded soldier. The following is one of its dozens of stanzas:

Children and War: Selected Highlights from The American Civil War Collection

“Finding the Real Cuba”: A Special ALA Breakfast Presentation

On Sunday, June 29, 2014, during the American Library Association annual conference, Readex will host a special breakfast presentation on “Finding the Real Cuba: Citizen-Entrepreneurs and the Communist-Capitalist State Today.” An open discussion will follow the talk by Lillian Guerra, Ph.D., Professor of Cuban & Caribbean History, University of Florida, and winner of 2014 fellowships from both the American Council of Learned Societies and the Guggenheim Foundation.

“Finding the Real Cuba”: A Special ALA Breakfast Presentation

Silent Auction to Support 2014 GODORT Scholarship Now Open for Bidding

Established in 1994, the W. David Rozkuszka Scholarship provides financial assistance to an individual who is 1) currently working with government documents in a library and 2) trying to complete a master’s degree in library science.
Silent Auction to Support 2014 GODORT Scholarship Now Open for Bidding

Nineteenth-Century Newspaper Editors Imagine the Twentieth-Century Newspaper

In 1895 editors at thirteen major American newspapers were asked to use their “prophetic powers” to forecast the news publishing world a century hence.

Over the previous decades, many of them had personally witnessed a host of “advancements in the art of newspaper making”: “from the Washington hand press to the perfecting press; from the stage coach to the telegraph; from paper at 10 cents to good paper at 2 cents a pound; from handset to marvelous typesetting machines…”

In this full-page article found in America’s Historical Newspapers, each of those prominent journalists “draw aside the curtain and peer into the future” to imagine the newspaper of 1995.

Here are excerpts from their predictions published nearly 120 years ago.

Nineteenth-Century Newspaper Editors Imagine the Twentieth-Century Newspaper

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