The Back-to-Africa Movement, American Colonization Society, and the Know Somethings

<p>The July release of <em>Afro-Americana Imprints, 1535-1922: From the Library Company of Philadelphia</em> has several items about the American Colonization Society and the movement to return freedman to Africa. Founded in 1816, the American Colonization Society was a coalition between two distinct groups: abolitionist evangelicals and Quakers on one side, and, on the other, slaveholders who saw in the repatriation of freedmen a way to prevent slave rebellions. Beginning in 1821, thousands of freedmen would eventually emigrate from the United States to what would become the Republic of Liberia.<br /><br />
The Back-to-Africa Movement, American Colonization Society, and the Know Somethings

Every Leaf a Panacea? Health and Wellness in 19th-Century American Pamphlets

<p>The latest recent release of <em>American Pamphlets, Series 1, 1820-1922</em>, includes many publications concerning health and treatments for a host of physical and mental complaints. Some of these pamphlets are almost 200 years old and yet they seem almost current in their concerns and causes, if not in their use of language, to contemporary American life.</p>
Every Leaf a Panacea? Health and Wellness in 19th-Century American Pamphlets

Civil War Intrigue and Reflections: Recent Items from The American Civil War Collection

<p>The July release of <em>The American Civil War Collection, 1860-1922: From the American Antiquarian Society</em> includes a tale of a British plot to destroy democracy, a case of Southern espionage, and a retrospective examination of the Trent Affair.</p> <p>Also found here are popular cultural items such as the history of a famous mid-19th-century singing group and a colorful children’s picture book featuring an advertisement for battle maps and more.<br /><br /><strong></strong></p>
Civil War Intrigue and Reflections: Recent Items from The American Civil War Collection

Religion and Atheism in the USSR: Selected Highlights from Recently Released JPRS Reports

<p>The June release of <em>Joint Publications Research Service (JPRS) Reports, 1957-1994</em>, includes a number of topical translations from the mid-1960s concerning religion and atheism in the Soviet Union. Below are five examples:</p> <p>&nbsp;</p>
Religion and Atheism in the USSR: Selected Highlights from Recently Released JPRS Reports

“One Lousy Sheep”: The 1958 Soviet Denunciation of Nobel Prize Winner Boris Pasternak

<p>In an article in the June 30, 2014, edition of the <em>Washington Post</em>, columnist and editorial page editor Fred Hiatt discusses the harsh denunciation of Boris Pasternak in a 1958 speech. The criticism of Pasternak as a pig occurred toward the end of a long and turgid oration on the subject of the Komsomol’s glorious history and mission by its director, Vladimir Semichastny, who later came to head the KGB.&nbsp;</p> <p>The attack on Pasternak, who a week earlier had been named the winner of the Nobel Prize for Literature for his novel <em>Doctor Zhivago</em>, was, as Hiatt notes, partially dictated by Nikita Khrushchev himself.&nbsp; That Oct. 29, 1958, speech was broadcast on the Soviet Home Service, translated by the Foreign Broadcast Information Service (FBIS), and published the following day in the FBIS Daily Report. An excerpt from the 18-page FBIS translation appears below:</p> <blockquote>
“One Lousy Sheep”: The 1958 Soviet Denunciation of Nobel Prize Winner Boris Pasternak

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