Interface Training: Make the Most of Your Readex Collections

Readex interface training sessions present a brief overview of collection content, highlight key interface features and functionality, and offer suggestions for classroom instruction. Specific examples of how faculty and students use the content are also provided. Sessions are organized around major Readex collection families. Register today for one or more today. 

 

America’s Historical Newspapers and World Newspaper Archive

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Collections covered include Early American Newspapers, African American Newspapers, Hispanic American Newspapers, Ethnic American Newspapers, Caribbean Newspapers, American Newspaper Archive and the World Newspaper Archive.  

 

America's Historical Imprints

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Collections covered include Afro-Americana Imprints, American Civil War Collection, American Pamphlets, American Slavery Collection, Early American Imprints, African History and Culture, Black Authors, Caribbean History and Culture, and American Broadsides and Ephemera.  

 

Interface Training: Make the Most of Your Readex Collections

New Webinar: Using Primary Sources to Engage Students

Learn how primary sources…

  • Introduce students to the experience of the past
  • Create deeper engagement with research activities
  • Spark lively discussions that improve the teaching process.

Getting some students excited about learning can be a daunting challenge. They’re often distracted by the current media environment. Primary sources, however, can transport them into a form of virtual-reality that gets them not only excited but also engaged with a topic. 

Day and Time:

Thursday, January 28, 2016 2:00 pm to 3:00 pm EST 

Presenter(s):

Debra Reddin Van Tuyll, Professor, Department of Communications, Augusta University 

 The objective in using primary sources—both print and material—is to put students into a virtual time machine that allows them to see, touch, feel, and even hear artifacts from earlier times. When teaching with primary sources—be it pamphlets printed by Benjamin Franklin or newspapers from the antebellum era—students’ eyes often widen and their attention becomes entirely focused on the topic at hand. 

Join us to discuss how to integrate primary sources into your teaching. Topics will include:

New Webinar: Using Primary Sources to Engage Students

“Hope, delusive hope”: Highlights from Black Authors, 1556-1922

Nathaniel Paul (1793?-1839)The December release of Black Authors, 1556-1922: Imprints from the Library Company of Philadelphia includes two celebratory speeches: the first by Russell Parrott on the anniversary of the cessation of the slave trade, and the second by Nathaniel Paul in observance of the abolition of slavery in New York. Also included this month is an alluring tract by occultist Paschal Beverly Randolph. 


 An Oration on the Abolition of the Slave Trade (1814)

By Russell Parrott

A relatively obscure figure in Philadelphia’s early African American community, Russell Parrott is best remembered for three speeches celebrating the abolition of slave trafficking. The Act Prohibiting Importation of Slaves went into effect on January 1, 1808, and anniversary orations quickly became a regular feature of the annual cycle of celebrations in African American churches.

After some brief prefatory remarks, Parrott opines: 

“Hope, delusive hope”: Highlights from Black Authors, 1556-1922

“A Portrait of Artifice, Duplicity, Haughtiness, Violence, Rapine, Avarice, Meanness, Rancor, and Dishonesty”: Highlights from Caribbean History and Culture, 1535-1920

The December release of Caribbean History and Culture, 1535-1920: Imprints from the Library Company of Philadelphia includes an illustrated multi-volume history of Jamaica published in 1774, an examination of the early-19th century slave laws of Jamaica and St. Christopher, and a two-volume history of Haiti published in 1830. 


The History of Jamaica (1774) 

By Edward Long 

A British colonial administrator, historian and author, Edward Long is best known for this three-volume work examining the governmental, legal, social, and commercial structures of Jamaica. Long also includes a survey of the island by parish and illustrations depicting several of the island’s rivers and bays. 

My intention is, to give a competent information of the establishments civil and military, and state, of Jamaica, its productions, and commerce; to speak compendiously of its agriculture; to give some account of the climate, soil, rivers, and mineral waters; with a summary description of its dependencies, counties, town, villages, and hamlets, and the most remarkable natural curiosities hitherto discovered in it; to display an impartial character of its inhabitants of all complexions, with some strictures on the Negro slaves in particular, and freed persons, and the laws affecting them; and to recommend some general rules and cautions for preserving the health of those who come hither from Northern climates. 

Long was critical of both the island’s administrators and the organizational system that allowed their malfeasance, writing: 

“A Portrait of Artifice, Duplicity, Haughtiness, Violence, Rapine, Avarice, Meanness, Rancor, and Dishonesty”: Highlights from Caribbean History and Culture, 1535-1920

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