The Sylvan Retreats of Early American Gentry: A Newly Available Work in the American Antiquarian Society Supplement

<p> <img alt="pl_007062016_1001_53420_15_Page_02.jpg" src="https://www.readex.com/sites/default/files/var/www/vhosts/readex.com/httpdocs/sites/default/files/blog/pl_007062016_1001_53420_15_Page_02.jpg" style="width: 314px; height: 203px; float: right;" />Included in the July release of newly digitized material from the American Antiquarian Society&rsquo;s <a href="http://www.readex.com/content/early-american-imprints-series-i-and-ii-su... to <em>Early American Imprints: Shaw-Shoemaker</em></a> is a collection of intaglio prints created by artist William Russell Birch.&nbsp; In this important work he depicts many of the elegant country estates of early 19th-century American gentry.</p> <hr /> <p> <strong>The Country Seats of the United States of North America, With Some Scenes Connected With Them</strong> (1809)</p> <p class="rtecenter"> <img alt="pl_007062016_1001_53420_15_Page_01.jpg" src="https://www.readex.com/sites/default/files/var/www/vhosts/readex.com/httpdocs/sites/default/files/blog/pl_007062016_1001_53420_15_Page_01.jpg" style="width:395px;height:336px;" /></p> <p> William Russell Birch, an engraver and an enamel portraitist, was born in England in 1775. In his youth he was apprenticed to a jeweler as well as portrait painter Sir Joshua Reynolds. Birch emigrated to the United States in 1794, and in 1809 he published this influential collection of intaglio prints of elegant country homes of prominent Americans.</p> <p class="rtecenter"> <img alt="American Seats.jpg" src="https://www.readex.com/sites/default/files/var/www/vhosts/readex.com/httpdocs/sites/default/files/blog/American%20Seats.jpg" style="width:448px;height:334px;" /></p> <p>
The Sylvan Retreats of Early American Gentry: A Newly Available Work in the American Antiquarian Society Supplement

History Professor Mark Summers Speaks about Gilded-Age Politics at Readex-Sponsored ALA Event [VIDEO]

With incredible energy and expertise, Mark Wahlgren Summers brought history to life with his dynamic interpretation of 19th-century political campaigns for the librarians and educators who attended a Readex-hosted breakfast during the American Library Association’s Annual Conference in Orlando. Summers, the Thomas D. Clark Professor of History at the University of Kentucky, where he has taught for the last 32 years, entertained the crowd with his highly animated lecture titled “Politics is just war without the bayonets”: Dirty Politics in a Genteel Age, 1868-1892.

Here, he describes stump speeches, often delivered at train stations, across the campaign trail:

 

Summers didn’t just tell the crowd about the past, he helped them experience it with his lively retelling, leading attendees to make comments like this:

 

For most historians, the Gilded Age was the Golden Age of American politics. Well before football or baseball found a vogue, it was the great participatory sport. Families turned out for parades, rallies and barbecues. Campaign clubs designed ornate uniforms and hired brass bands to precede them as they marched. Eligible voters in record numbers showed up at the polls. Watch the full presentation to understand why Summers warned that to be wistful for those days is a grave mistake.

History Professor Mark Summers Speaks about Gilded-Age Politics at Readex-Sponsored ALA Event [VIDEO]

“Glory to God! See the Vermonters go it!”: Highlights from The American Civil War Collection

<p> <img alt="Other CW 2 sm.jpg" src="https://www.readex.com/sites/default/files/var/www/vhosts/readex.com/httpdocs/sites/default/files/blog/Other%20CW%202%20sm.jpg" style="width: 314px; height: 231px; float: right;" />The current release of imprints from <a href="http://www.readex.com/content/american-civil-war-collection-1860-1922-am... American Civil War Collection, 1860-1922</em>: <em>From the American Antiquarian Society</em></a> includes&nbsp;an intimate recollection of the first Union general to die in the war,&nbsp;an account of a nostalgic return of aging veterans to the scenes of their service in the war, and&nbsp;a remembered account of a peculiar phenomenon experienced by Union soldiers in Louisiana.</p> <hr /> <p> <strong>Personal Recollections of General Nathaniel Lyon. Prepared by Companion Brigadier-General William A. Hammond, U.S.A. </strong>(1900)</p> <p class="rtecenter"> <img alt="Title page CW 1.jpg" src="https://www.readex.com/sites/default/files/var/www/vhosts/readex.com/httpdocs/sites/default/files/blog/Title%20page%20CW%201.jpg" style="width: 277px; height: 448px;" /></p> <p>
“Glory to God! See the Vermonters go it!”: Highlights from The American Civil War Collection

A Day at the (Space) Races: Gherman Titov and Vostok-2 Raise the Stakes of Manned Space Flight

<p style="margin-left:.5in;"> &ldquo;Socialism is the launching platform from which the Soviet Union shoots off its cosmic ships.&rdquo; &mdash;Nikita S. Khrushchev</p> <p class="rtecenter"> <img alt="JPRS July Blog Benoit Image 1.jpg" src="https://www.readex.com/sites/default/files/var/www/vhosts/readex.com/httpdocs/sites/default/files/blog/JPRS%20July%20Blog%20Benoit%20Image%201.jpg" style="width: 550px; height: 426px;" title="From JPRS Reports" /></p> <p> On 6 August 1961, less than four years after <em>Sputnik</em> and not quite four months after Yuri Gagarin&#39;s historic orbital flight, Gherman Titov accomplished a flight of over seventeen orbits, lasting more than a day. This achievement had the desired effect of serving notice to the United States that Soviet space exploration was neither a fluke nor a stunt, but a sustained program to demonstrate the technical superiority&mdash;and by extension, the socio-political potency&mdash;of socialism over capitalism. In these documents from the current release of <a href="http://www.readex.com/content/joint-publications-research-service-jprs-r... Publications Research Service (JPRS) Reports, 1957-1995</em></a>, we offer direct quotations from Titov himself, scientists, a journalist, even a farmer witnessing Titov&#39;s landing.</p> <p class="rtecenter"> <img alt="JPRS July Blog Benoit Image 2.jpg" src="https://www.readex.com/sites/default/files/var/www/vhosts/readex.com/httpdocs/sites/default/files/blog/JPRS%20July%20Blog%20Benoit%20Image%202.jpg" style="width: 550px; height: 275px;" title="From JPRS Reports" /></p> <hr /> <p> <strong>Preparation for Man&#39;s Flight into Cosmic Space</strong></p> <p>
A Day at the (Space) Races: Gherman Titov and Vostok-2 Raise the Stakes of Manned Space Flight

“What appears to be wise and right”: Highlights from Afro-Americana Imprints, 1535-1922

<p> <img alt="LincolnPortrait.jpg" src="https://www.readex.com/sites/default/files/var/www/vhosts/readex.com/httpdocs/sites/default/files/blog/LincolnPortrait.jpg" style="width: 104px; height: 157px; float: right;" />This month&rsquo;s release of <a href="http://www.readex.com/content/afro-americana-imprints-1535-1922-library-... Imprints, 1535-1922: From the Library Company of Philadelphia</em></a> includes works illustrating various forms of internal strife caused by slavery and the opposition to it. Highlighted here&mdash;in George Washington&#39;s &quot;Last Will and Testament,&quot; a book by an Irish abolitionist, and a compilation of the wisdom of Abraham Lincoln&mdash;are examples of conflicting sentiments within an individual, a movement, and a country.&nbsp;</p> <hr /> <p> &nbsp;</p> <p class="rtecenter"> <img alt="WashingtonWillTitlePage.jpg" src="https://www.readex.com/sites/default/files/var/www/vhosts/readex.com/httpdocs/sites/default/files/blog/WashingtonWillTitlePage.jpg" style="width:265px;height:448px;" /></p> <p> <strong>The Last Will and Testament of General George Washington</strong> (1800)</p> <p> <em>By George Washington</em></p> <blockquote> <p>
“What appears to be wise and right”: Highlights from Afro-Americana Imprints, 1535-1922

“A Taste for Human Flesh”: The Jersey Shore Shark Attacks of 1916

<blockquote> <p> As the lifeguards drew near him the water about the man was suddenly tinged with red and he shrieked loudly. A woman on shore cried that the man in the red canoe had upset, but others realized it was blood that colored the water and the woman fainted.</p> <p> (&ldquo;Shark Kills Bather off Jersey Beach,&quot; <em>The Evening Times</em> (Pawtucket, Rhode Island), July 7, 1916)</p> </blockquote> <p> <img alt="Sm Shk.jpg" src="https://www.readex.com/sites/default/files/var/www/vhosts/readex.com/httpdocs/sites/default/files/blog/Sm%20Shk.jpg" style="width: 223px; height: 225px; float: left;" />Charles Bruder, an employee of a Spring Haven, New Jersey resort, had just become the second victim in a series of shark attacks that plagued the Jersey shore in July 1916. Reflecting the widespread national coverage these local attacks received, <a href="http://www.readex.com/content/early-american-newspapers-1690-1922"><em>E... American Newspapers</em></a> contains rich cache of articles covering the terrible events of that summer.</p> <p> The first incident took place on Saturday, July 1, in Beach Haven, N.J. By the following Monday the news had been picked up by the <em>Cleveland Plain Dealer</em>:</p> <blockquote> <p> Charles E. Vansant, 23, son of a Philadelphia physician, was attacked by a shark or other big fish while bathing in the surf off here yesterday, according to eyewitnesses, and died before he could be rescued.</p> <p> Alexander Ott, an expert swimmer, who saw the encounter, rushed to Vansant&rsquo;s assistance, but he was apparently dead when Ott reached him.</p> <p> There were wounds on Vansant&rsquo;s legs showing he had been bitten.</p> </blockquote> <p>
“A Taste for Human Flesh”: The Jersey Shore Shark Attacks of 1916

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