‘A Rope of Sand’: Highlights from The American Civil War Collection, 1860-1922

The June release of The American Civil War Collection, 1860-1922: From the American Antiquarian Society includes an 1862 speech from the House floor in favor of the “confiscation of rebel property,” a history of the war by a Morgan's Raid commander, and a speech honoring “the remarkable career and character of Edward Augustus Wild,” a local war hero from Brookline, Massachusetts.


Confiscation of Rebel Property (1862)

Speech of Hon. William Kellogg, of Illinois, delivered in the House of Representatives, May 24, 1862

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William Kellogg (1814-1872) served in both the Illinois and U.S. House of Representatives. After refusing an appointment to be Minister to Guatemala, Kellogg accepted the position of Chief Justice of the Territorial Supreme Court of the Nebraska Territory.

While serving in the U.S House, Kellogg was vocal in debates related to the onset of the war. In 1860, he was appointed to the Committee of Thirty-Three which was charged with proposing a path to avert war. The next year Kellogg introduced a substitute to the proposal of the committee. His proposal allowed slavery to continue in limited states and territories. He was criticized for this position and in the following year argued in favor of war power and the power of confiscation by the state.

In this speech on the “Confiscation of Rebel Property, delivered from the House floor, Kellogg said:

‘A Rope of Sand’: Highlights from The American Civil War Collection, 1860-1922

The Territorial Imperative: Readex’s First Release of the Territorial Papers of the United States

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In the early days of the American republic, the territorial imperative that would develop into manifest destiny was more of an optimistic thought experiment than an imperial (or divine) mandate to subdue the wilderness. For the first release of Readex’s Territorial Papers of the United States, let’s examine a few deceptively simple terms and the concepts underlying them, namely Territory, and Paper.

A Territory denotes a specific piece of land over which a consistent level of sovereignty and law is extended. But what did that require, exactly? When surveys were perilous, expensive and imprecise, and even explicit natural boundaries were often contested, the concept of a Territory required magical thinking. Certainly American Indians took that position; the boundaries delineated in treaties and land grants took little account of indigenous traditions, alliances and patterns of settlement. In that much U.S. territories seemed quixotic and arbitrary, foisted upon established societies that could do quite well without legal title, not to mention Indian removal.

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The Territorial Imperative: Readex’s First Release of the Territorial Papers of the United States

Readex Announces New Collections Coming Fall 2018

Readex is pleased to announce several new digital collections created in partnership with such leading repositories as the American Antiquarian Society, The British Library, and others.  Coming fall 2018, these primary source collections are designed to meet wide-ranging teaching and research needs in diverse areas of American and African studies. 


African Newspapers: The British Library Collection

AN BL image.JPGCreated in partnership with the British Library, this unique database features 64 newspapers from across the African continent, all published before 1900. From culture to history to geopolitics, the pages of these newspapers offer fresh research opportunities for students and scholars interested in topics related to Africa, including European exploration, colonial exploitation, economics, Atlantic trade, early moves towards self-governance, the growth of South Africa, and much more. Because Africa produced comparatively few newspapers in the 19th century, each page in this collection is significant, offering invaluable insight into the people, issues and events that shaped the continent. Through eyewitness reporting, editorials, letters, advertisements, obituaries, and military reports, the newspapers in this one-of-a-kind collection chronicle African history and daily life as never before.


American Policy Series

Readex Announces New Collections Coming Fall 2018

“Children naturally love truth”: Rare Illustrated Works of Juvenile Literature

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This month’s release of Early American Imprints, Series II: Supplement 3 from the American Antiquarian Society highlights three of the rarest early 19th-century books for children—all of which are distinguished by their illustrations.


 

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Juvenile Miscellany, Including Some Natural History, for the Use of Children. Ornamented with Eighteen Engravings (1803)

The intaglio prints which adorn this imprint are as varied as the text. The author declares his serious intent:

“Children naturally love truth, and when they read a story, enquire whether it is true? If they find it true, they are pleased with it; if not, they value it but little; and soon it becomes insipid.”

Admitting this sentiment as sound doctrine, the editor of the present little volume has been careful to select such matter for his young friends, as cannot fail to interest them, and at the same time, leave on their minds some useful impression.

The text is an admixture of moral tales and axioms:

When you are lawfully engaged in the business of life, take heed that your heart and affections cleave not to the dust.

Our principles only become pleasing and delightful, when by the influence of them we learn to calm and govern our passions; and are formed by them into such a temper, as renders us capable of cheerfully enjoying the blessings of the present world, and the higher happiness of a better.

“Children naturally love truth”: Rare Illustrated Works of Juvenile Literature

‘Keep Them in Subjection’: Highlights from The American Civil War Collection, 1860-1922

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The May release of The American Civil War Collection, 1860-1922: From the American Antiquarian Society includes differing perspectives on American slavery from a British naturalist and a British religious leader.  Also included is a report by a Congressional select committee investigating the 1866 riots in New Orleans.


Life in the South (1863)

By Catherine Cooper Hopley

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In this two-volume book, British author, artist, and naturalist Catherine Cooper Hopley (1817-1911) is sympathetic to the Confederacy and slave owners. She recounts her observations of the social culture in Virginia from the spring of 1860 to August 1862.  Contrasting the attitudes of Northerners and Southerners toward the English, Hopley writes:

By this time one could scarcely fail to remark how essentially the characters of the Northern and Southern people differ. Here it was common to hear one’s country and one’s countrymen extolled with a generosity quite untainted by the petty envyings and jealousies, fostered, if not expressed, by the Yankee proper towards the rival Englishman. The Southern people were ever ready to speak in praise of any English person they had happened to know, and appeared to take pleasure in so doing; and the more the hostile feeling increased towards the North the more cordial did they appear in their welcome to the descendants of their ancestral England.

‘Keep Them in Subjection’: Highlights from The American Civil War Collection, 1860-1922

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