American History


The Short-Lived Republic of West Florida: A Tale of Deception and Intrigue

Map Credit: Courtesy of the Special Collections Department, University of South Florida. Digitization provided by the USF Libraries Digitization Center.

The Short-Lived Republic of West Florida: A Tale of Deception and Intrigue

"She Wields a Mighty Dashing Pen": Journalist Jane Cunningham Croly

Jane Cunningham Croly (Source: The Bohemian Brigade Website)

"She Wields a Mighty Dashing Pen": Journalist Jane Cunningham Croly

Halloween Happenings in Historical Newspapers

For nearly 200 years, American newspapers have chronicled the evolution of the eve of All Saints Day from religious observance into night of devilish doings. Articles brim with accounts of prayers and prognostications, banshees and bar hopping, parties and property damage, tasty confections and rumors of hidden pins, poison and razor blades. Depending on perspective, the darkening days of late autumn represent either a time of fear and dread or a chance for fun and frivolity.
Halloween Happenings in Historical Newspapers

Exploring the Language of the Popular in Anglo-American Newspapers, 1833-1988

AHRC RESEARCH NETWORK – CALL FOR PAPERS

Principal Investigator Dr Martin Conboy, Department of Journalism Studies, University of Sheffield

Exploring the Language of the Popular in Anglo-American Newspapers, 1833-1988

The United Nations as Teacher

Suppose there were an information source from which you could learn practically everything about how the world’s 191 countries operate?  What makes these global citizens tick?  Why do they do what they do? Why, for instance, did Saddam Hussein invade Kuwait in the first place?  And why did some military experts and historians compare that invasion to Hitler’s conquest of Czechoslovakia in 1938?  How did the 1994 civil war in Rwanda result in the massacre of half a million people?  What forces keep the Middle East in perpetual turmoil?
The United Nations as Teacher

Newspapers: "the rough draft of history"

Paper: The State; Date: Dec. 5, 1905; Issue 5302; Page 1; Columbia, South Carolina

Newspapers: "the rough draft of history"

America's Historical Newspapers reviewed in new issue of Journal of American History

The September 2010 issue of the Journal of American History—the quarterly journal of the Organization of American Historians—features this review of America's Historical Newspapers

America's Historical Newspapers reviewed in new issue of Journal of American History

Exploring Mexico's Revolutions in American Newspapers

This year marks the 200th anniversary of the initial uprising that would lead to the independence of Mexico from Spain.  2010 is also the 100th anniversary of the Mexican revolution of 1910, which overthrew President Porfirio Diaz.  Both revolutions lasted around a decade. The 1810 uprising is traditionally thought to have begun on September 16. This article published on December 20, 1810 in Boston’s Independent Chronicle shows how early news of the uprising was presented in the United States. It’s short and to the point.
On February 23, 1811, Baltimore’s Federal Gazette contained this translation of an article from the November 20, 1810 issue of the Spanish-language Mexico Gazette. The original article is a first-person account by Brigadier Don Felix Calleja of his actions in the field against the insurgents. Everything traveled slowly then, not just news. Publishers had no fear of reprinting materials from wherever they could get them.

Exploring Mexico's Revolutions in American Newspapers

Women's Suffrage: The Frontier Background

"Spirit of the Frontier" by John Gast (1872)

Women's Suffrage: The Frontier Background

Materials and Methods in Early American Religion: A Society of Early Americanists Conference Roundtable

Panel Chair: Chris Phillips, Lafayette College Scholarly interest in early American religions has greatly expanded in recent years across a variety of disciplines. This panel is intended to generate discussion about how ideas about doing research on religious topics has changed, and how scholars can best use archives, both digital and physical, many of which are only newly available. The chair invites one-page proposals for 10-minute talks (not formal papers) from any field, including interdisciplinary studies. Possible questions may include: • What is a religious artifact? • What can we know from what we find in the archive? • How do issues of access (cataloging, access costs, research funding, etc.) inform or limit research in these areas? • What might the future relationship between digital and physical collections look like? • Do digital forms of research and delivery offer new paradigms for understanding religions? • How do contemporary notions of religiosity and secularity affect work on early American religion? • How do we deal with “gaps” in the archive? • What new paradigms or metaphors, beyond recovery, reconstruction, etc., might we use in studying this topic, especially in the context of women, children, and ethnic minorities? • What are the possibilities for studying the place of orality in American religions? How do we bring the study of religion to our students? Please send proposals to Chris Phillips, Assistant Professor of English, Lafayette College (phillipc@lafayette.edu) by September 20, 2010.
Materials and Methods in Early American Religion: A Society of Early Americanists Conference Roundtable

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