American History


Top-Ten Articles Published in The Readex Report

The Readex Report is a quarterly e-newsletter that explores diverse aspects of both modern librarianship and digital historical collections. Through original articles by academic faculty and librarians, The Readex Report provides insights on topics as wide-ranging as those found in the following list of the most clicked-upon articles published since 2006. Preserving the Library in the Digital Age

By Benjamin L. Carp, Assistant Professor of History, Tufts University [Volume 4, Issue 4]

Heart or Muscle? The Library in the Digital Age

By Edward Shephard, State University of New York, Binghamton [Volume 4, Issue 3]

“Meet the Students”: Bringing Your Library’s Online Resources Into Your Students’ “Circle of Trust”

By Lynn D. Lampert, Chair, Reference & Instructional Services, California State University, Northridge [Volume 2, Issue 2]

Top-Ten Articles Published in The Readex Report

Just Browsing: Cool Items from the Past

One of the joys of browsing American historical newspapers is discovering the unexpected from around the world. Take this photograph, for example, of a car being dragged across a Siberian river during the Peking-to-Paris race in 1907:

Source: Cleveland Plain Dealer; Date: Aug. 18, 1907; Page: 29

Or this photo of European ostrich racing in the 1920s:

Source: Cleveland Plain Dealer, Date: Sept. 28, 1924; Page 76

Just Browsing: Cool Items from the Past

"A Dastardly Outrage": Kate Brown and the Washington-Alexandria Railroad Case

[Kate Brown, a U.S. Senate laundress promoted to retiring room attendant, is most notable for winning the 1873 Supreme Court Case Railroad Company v. Brown. This spring Brown was the focus of a winning entry in a research competition sponsored by the Oxford African American Studies Center and the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History. That winning entry on Brown, which will be published in the online African American National Biography, was researched and written by McLean (VA) High School students Brian Tong and Theodore Lin, who utilized the U.S. Congressional Serial Set among other sources. The article on Kate Brown below was written by Betty K. Koed, Assistant Historian in the U.S. Senate Historical Office. It appeared in the September 2008 issue of The Readex Report, where it was published with permission from Unum, a newsletter published by the Office of the Secretary of the United States Senate.]
"A Dastardly Outrage": Kate Brown and the Washington-Alexandria Railroad Case

You are what you eat? Maybe, maybe not

Source: Morning Oregonian, Feb. 5, 1910

Low-fat? Low-calorie? Low-carb? Headlines seem to grab the public’s interest every day with warnings about what and what not to eat. With food-related health issues and rising obesity rates getting so much attention in the United States and around the world, it is tempting to think that mankind’s struggles with diet are new. But of course they aren’t!

Source: Rising Sun (Kansas City, MO), May 26, 1905. Click to open in PDF.

You are what you eat? Maybe, maybe not

Avoiding Errors, Fopperies, and Follies: How to be a Good Wife

 [This article by Elizabeth Hopwood, a graduate student in the English Department at Northeastern University, first appeared in the February 2011 issue of The Readex Report.]

Avoiding Errors, Fopperies, and Follies: How to be a Good Wife

Robert Smalls: Contraband Captain and U.S. Congressman

Robert Smalls (April 5, 1839–February 23, 1915)

Robert Smalls: Contraband Captain and U.S. Congressman

The Bomarc Missile Plutonium Spill Crisis: Exercises in Propaganda and Containment in 1960 and Beyond

According to the Boeing Corporation’s history of its Bomarc missile,

Source: Boeing.com

The Bomarc Missile Plutonium Spill Crisis: Exercises in Propaganda and Containment in 1960 and Beyond

First release of Ethnic American Newspapers now available for trial

Maximum Prepublication Discount Ends Soon

The first release of Ethnic American Newspapers from the Balch Collection, 1799-1971 is live, and this unique new resource is now available for institutional trial. Created from the newspaper holdings of the former Balch Institute of Ethnic Studies—arguably the best known ethnic research center in America—and the Historical Society of Pennsylvania, one of the largest and oldest family history libraries in the nation, this online collection will present more than 130 searchable newspapers, including many rare 19th-century titles.

Two centuries of immigrant life in the U.S.

First release of Ethnic American Newspapers now available for trial

Commodore Vanderbilt: Patriot or War Profiteer?

Post by T.J. Stiles, author of The First Tycoon: The Epic Life of Cornelius Vanderbilt (Knopf)

[Note: On April 7, 2011, the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation, as part of its 87th annual competition, awarded a Fellowship to T.J. Stiles based on impressive prior achievement and exceptional promise for future accomplishment. This article by T.J. Stiles appeared in the February 2010 issue of The Readex Report. Here he discusses his use of the Readex digital edition of the U.S. Congressional Serial Set in researching The First Tycoon, which won both a National Book Award and a Pulitzer Prize.]
Commodore Vanderbilt: Patriot or War Profiteer?

Law and Disorder: Urbana University Students Bring an 1857 Court Case to Life

 

Our guest blogger today is Julie Ann McDaniel, Librarian, Swedenborg Memorial Library,Urbana University 

Source: The Historical Marker DataBase

Mechanicsburg, Ohio is a really small place today—less than 2,000 people—so imagine what the population would have been in 1857. But this little community was the site of an event that lead to a federal court case to determine the constitutionality of the Fugitive Slave Act.

 

Many local students knew vaguely of the story of Addison White, a runaway slave from Kentucky. His master tracked him to Mechanicsburg and sent slave catchers to bring him back. No one expected the townspeople of Mechanicsburg to arrive with pitchforks and carpet beaters to chase the slave catchers away.

Law and Disorder: Urbana University Students Bring an 1857 Court Case to Life

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