American History


Select historical newspapers published in cities, states, regions or any combination

From Maine to California, the most comprehensive collection of U.S. newspapers published in the 18th, 19th and 20th centuries is America’s Historical Newspapers. Continually expanding, this unique online resource features thousands of historical newspapers published in more than 450 cities from Alaska to Florida. And now, you can create your own customized collection from all available titles published in any U.S. region, state, or city. Easily build a custom collection that meets your institution's budget America's Historical Newspapers Select is an essential tool for many types of historical research. Students and faculty can easily search any combination of titles within a single, easy-to-use interface, and when your institution’s needs expand, titles from additional locations can be added at any time. Consider any custom configuration, including: • Appalachian states • Coastal Colonial cities • Confederate States of America • Deep South • Ghost Towns • Great Plains • Maryland, Virginia, and Washington, D.C. • New Jersey, New York City and Philadelphia • New Orleans and Mobile • Rocky Mountain states • West Coast
Select historical newspapers published in cities, states, regions or any combination

Helen Keller—Child of Adversity, Woman of the World

From the Missouri Republican, Apr. 1, 1888. Click to open.

Helen Keller—Child of Adversity, Woman of the World

Early Radio Broadcasting: Solving Mysteries with America's Historical Newspapers

[This article by Donna L. Halper, Assistant Professor of Communication at Lesley University, first appeared in the February 2011 issue of The Readex Report.]

Early Radio Broadcasting: Solving Mysteries with America's Historical Newspapers

Easy Access to Historically Significant U.S. Newspapers

A wide selection of diverse titles reveals local, regional and national history Dozens of significant titles from more than 40 states are available individually as a part of America’s Historical Newspapers. These American Newspaper Archives, many spanning two centuries, provide valuable perspectives and reporting on crucial conflicts from the Civil War to World War I to the Gulf War; movements ranging from women’s suffrage to civil rights; noteworthy citizens; local events; natural disasters; political campaigns; and much more. Featured titles:
Easy Access to Historically Significant U.S. Newspapers

Prepublication Discount on Ethnic American Newspapers from the Balch Collection

Explore the American immigrant experience!

Ethnic American Newspapers from the Balch Collection, 1799-1971 presents more than 130 searchable newspapers in 10 languages from 25 states—including many rare 19th-century titles. This online collection provides extensive coverage of many of the most influential ethnic groups in U.S. history, with an emphasis on Americans of Czech, French, German, Hungarian, Irish, Italian, Japanese, Jewish, Lithuanian, Polish, Slovak and Welsh descent. "Ethnic American Newspapers from the Balch Collection opens a marvelous window into immigrant life in America. These newspapers of many different ethnic groups and diverse localities embrace over two hundred years of the American experience. In them we find many small but essential details of immigrant life, including their divisions, their controversies, and their struggles to adapt to the American environment." — James M. Bergquist, Emeritus Professor of History, Villanova University

First Release: Late Spring 2011 — Prepublication Discount Available!

Prepublication Discount on Ethnic American Newspapers from the Balch Collection

Anti-Flirtation: There Ought to Be a Law

February 27, 1923. Miss Alice Reighly, Anti-Flirt Club president, Washington, D.C.

Anti-Flirtation: There Ought to Be a Law

Writing the David Ruggles Biography: Newspapers Help Complete the Portrait of a Radical Black Abolitionist

 [This article by Graham Russell Gao Hodges, George Dorland Langdon Jr. Professor of History and Africana & Latin American Studies, Colgate University first appeared in the February 2011 issue of The Readex Report.]

Writing the David Ruggles Biography: Newspapers Help Complete the Portrait of a Radical Black Abolitionist

100 Years Ago: A Look Back at 1911

One hundred years ago this month, Ronald Reagan was born in the Illinois village of Tampico. Other prominent Americans born in 1911 include Lucille Ball, Romare Bearden, Elizabeth Bishop, Hank Greenberg, Spike Jones and Tennessee Williams. What else happened in 1911? Here’s a brief look at six memorable events from a century ago.

Amundsen reaches the South Pole.

Source: National Library of Australia

100 Years Ago: A Look Back at 1911

Valentine's Day in 19th-Century American Newspapers

Farmers' Register (14 May 1805)

An early mention of Valentine’s Day in an American newspaper comes from the Farmers' Register (Lansingburgh, NY). This article, reprinted from an unnamed British paper, notes the increase in Valentine’s Day letters passing through the London post office from 60,000 in 1804 to 80,000 in 1805. Clearly, the practice of sending notes to a lover was growing noticeably. 

Connecticut Herald (14 May 1811)

Valentine's Day in 19th-Century American Newspapers

Flashbacks: Filling in the Blanks (with the Seattle Times historical archive)

Maybe you missed it, or perhaps you weren’t yet born. But imagine for just a moment that you’d made the trip from Seattle, Washington, to Max Yasgur’s Bethel, New York, farm in the late summer of 1969. You were one of the half-million people attending the Woodstock Music and Art Fair. One of your traveling companions embarked on the trip to protest the war in Vietnam. Another tagged along for the three-day party. You however came for the music. And moreover, you’d endured three hungry days of rain, long Porta-John lines, and National Guard rations for this singular moment. The opening riff to Jimi Hendrix’s “Message to Love” brings you out of your tent, and onto your feet. He’s your hometown hero. His white Fender Stratocaster, manufactured for a right-handed player, is strung upside-down for his deft left-handed manipulation. He’s working the fret-board furiously with long, spindly fingers. And just then, you flash back.
Flashbacks: Filling in the Blanks (with the Seattle Times historical archive)

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