American History


Shipwreck Found in Lake Michigan: The Sinking of the L.R. Doty as Covered in 19th-Century Newspapers

The Doty at the Soo Locks 1896 - Andrew Young photo courtesy of the Historical Collections of the Great Lakes

On June 24, the Associated Press (AP) distributed an article about the recent discovery of the L.R. Doty, a steamship that sank in Lake Michigan in 1898.  The article begins: 

A great wooden steamship that sank more than a century ago in a violent Lake Michigan storm has been found off the Milwaukee-area shoreline, and divers say the intact vessel appears to have been perfectly preserved by the cold fresh waters.  "Finding the 300-foot-long L.R. Doty was important because it was the largest wooden ship that remained unaccounted for," said Brendon Baillod, the president of the Wisconsin Underwater Archaeology Association.

When the L.R. Doty sank on October 27, 1898, the reports about its demise were numerous.  A brief article in the October 28, 1898 issue of the Dallas Morning News only listed the names of the captain, the chief engineer, and the first mate. 

Shipwreck Found in Lake Michigan: The Sinking of the L.R. Doty as Covered in 19th-Century Newspapers

The Pope's Stone, Part Two: The Bloody Bedini Background

[The Pope’s Stone, Part One discussed the theft and destruction of a block of marble sent by Pope Pius IX in 1853 to be placed in the Washington Monument, under construction on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. This Part Two recounts some inflammatory background to that embarrassing episode in American history in the form of the perilous visit of a Vatican prelate just before the destruction of the stone.]

The announcement of his upcoming visit was short and succinct, in no way foreshadowing the waves of bigotry, chaos, and violence, which over the following seven months would accompany his progress through America. Baltimore’s Sunof June 27, 1853 reported simply:

"Monsignor Bedini, Archbishop of Thebes, former Commissary Extraordinary of the Pontifical Government to the Legations, has left Rome as special Envoy of His Holiness to the United States. He is charged by the Holy Father to pay a visit to the government at Washington, and also to hold interviews with different Prelates of the Church in the United States, and to acquire the most exact information respecting the interests and condition of the Catholic Church in this country. After making as along a visit as may be of advantage in the United States, Monsignor Bedini will go to Brazil, where he is to reside as Apostolic Nuncio near that Government."

Gaetano Bedini was born on May 15, 1806 in Sinigaglia, Italy, also the birthplace of Pius IX, not far from the Adriatic. After his ordination in 1828, Bedini was awarded a Doctor Utriusque Juris (i.e. doctorate in civil and canon law) and became secretary to Cardinal Altieri, Papal Nuncio at Vienna. In 1846 he was sent by the Pope to serve as Apostolic Internuncio [a sort of junior ambassador] to the Imperial Court of Brazil, where in the words of J.F. Connelley

The Pope's Stone, Part Two: The Bloody Bedini Background

"Tears in England": Will World Cup History Repeat Itself?

From the Springfield Union, July 1, 1950, page 18

England will meet the United States in the first game either team plays in the 2010 World Cup. The tournament begins this Friday, June 11, with the England vs. U.S. game occurring Saturday afternoon in the Eastern Time zone. The first time the two teams met produced a stunning upset in 1950. The Springfield Union quoted British newspapers as saying that the loss "marks the lowest ever for British sport," and "is the biggest soccer upset of all time." A reporter for the U.K.’s Daily Graphic wrote: "It was pathetic to see the cream of English players beaten by a side (team) most amateur players at home would have beaten..." A search within 20th-Century American Newspapers on "World Cup" and "soccer" in the year 1950 reveals only 10 articles in the pages of eight major U.S. papers. In contrast, this year ESPN and its family of networks will be broadcasting every game from the tournament. Times, and American interest in the sport, have changed.
"Tears in England": Will World Cup History Repeat Itself?

The Charleston Advisor awards Early American Newspapers 4.75 stars

The April 2010 issue of The Charleston Advisor includes a two-page review of America's Historical Newspapers by Providence College librarian Janice Schuster. Focusing on Early American Newspapers, Series 1 to 7, 1690-1922, The Charleston Advisor awarded this collection its highest ranking in the categories of Content, Searchability and Contract Options. Here’s an excerpt:
"The initial search screen makes it very clear which searching options are available. One can immediately start searching using the Google-like search box and the drop-down menu of searching options, including Headline, Standard Title (i.e., publication title), and Title as published....The results list includes a wealth of information for each item, including title of publication; publication date; published as; location; headline, and article type....The results list also includes a thumbnail image (actually larger than a thumbnail) of a portion of the article. This facilitates research by making it easy to browse through and eliminate irrelevant items....
The Charleston Advisor awards Early American Newspapers 4.75 stars

Illustrated Journalism: The Innovative Use of Maps by Northern Newspapers to Report Civil War Events

First map of Battle of Gettysburg, showing first day’s fighting. (Phil. Inquirer; July 4, 1863)

Illustrated Journalism: The Innovative Use of Maps by Northern Newspapers to Report Civil War Events

The Pope’s Stone: Part One

From the Serial Set: History of the Washington National Monument and Washington National Monument Society. Compiled by Frederick L. Harvey, Secretary Washington National Monument Society. February 6, 1903

The Pope’s Stone: Part One

If At First You Do Not Succeed: Walt Disney Introduces Mickey Mouse (May 15, 1928)

To say that iconic brands are prevalent in today’s society is a bit of an understatement. Everywhere you look, there’s a sign for a name brand, a store, a large company. It may be hard to imagine a time when this wasn’t the case—when not only was that big name unknown, but it was rejected. Take Disney for example: Can you think of a time when Mickey Mouse wasn’t an icon for family fun? If you’ve grown up in the United States within the last, say, 70 years or so, chances are that you may have seen this mouse a time or two! Looking back at those early years though, Walt Disney didn’t always find success. In fact, in the late 1920s the combination of Mickey Mouse and Disney was a gamble that few were willing to take.

From the Plain Dealer, Cleveland, Ohio, May 1, 1955

If At First You Do Not Succeed: Walt Disney Introduces Mickey Mouse (May 15, 1928)

Defying Destiny, Dirty Politics, Revolutionary News and 19th-Century Mummymania: The Readex Report, Volume 5, Issue 2

In the current issue of The Readex Report...

Tom Standage, Economist business affairs editor, describes how nineteenth-century newspapers survived a disruptive technology in Defying Destiny;

LeeAnna Keith, history teacher at New York City's Collegiate School, pieces together dirty politics in Reconstruction-era Louisiana in Following the Trail of a Deep South Massacre;

Goucher College history professor Matthew Hale explores the relationship between English Romantic poet William Wordsworth and American newspapers during the French Revolution in Measuring Time in a Blissful Dawn;

Defying Destiny, Dirty Politics, Revolutionary News and 19th-Century Mummymania: The Readex Report, Volume 5, Issue 2

Join Readex to Hear James McGrath Morris and Steven Daniel at the 2010 American Library Association Annual Conference

Will you be attending the American Library Association conference this summer?  If so, make a date with Readex to attend a special breakfast event focusing on the use of digital resources for historical research.

Photo by Michael Mudd

Join Readex to Hear James McGrath Morris and Steven Daniel at the 2010 American Library Association Annual Conference

The More Things Change: Selected U.S. Congressional Serial Set Documents, 1983

Twenty-seven years ago, the government publications listed below were published in the U.S. Congressional Serial Set. They came from the 1st Session of the 98th Congress, 1983. When I scan the titles of these publications, I have to wonder whether they really were published that long ago because the issues are just as relevant today, if not more. Here are a half dozen that strike me as particularly timely:

What changes are most needed in the procedures used in the United States justice system? (Serial Set II Vol. No. 13497 98th Congress, 1st Session S.Doc. 5 945 p. 1983)

Should producers of hazardous waste be legally responsible for injuries caused by the waste? (Serial Set II Vol. No. 13527 98th Congress, 1st Session H.Doc. 93 594 p. 1983)

Emergency mathematics and science education act. (Serial Set II Vol. No. 13533 98th Congress, 1st Session H.Rpt. 6 121 p. February 17, 1983)

The More Things Change: Selected U.S. Congressional Serial Set Documents, 1983

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