Collection Development


A Sports Legend and His Dream: Bobby Jones, the Augusta National Golf Club and the Birth of the Masters

Bobby Jones entered the Roaring Twenties still the teenage prodigy who had first come to the public's attention when he qualified for the U.S. Amateur Championship at the age of 14. By the end of the 1920s, Jones was firmly established as a major star. The only golfer considered one of the true icons of the Golden Age of Sports, Bobby Jones stood alongside Babe Ruth, Red Grange, Jack Dempsey and Bill Tilden as giants in the public eye.
A Sports Legend and His Dream: Bobby Jones, the Augusta National Golf Club and the Birth of the Masters

Archive of Americana transports you through time into 18th- and 19th-century America

As a Readex account executive, I enjoy the opportunity to help bring our digital collections to the attention of students and scholars at some of the smallest four-year colleges. Occasionally, this extends to working collaboratively with librarians and faculty. Among my accounts is Washington College on Maryland’s Eastern Shore. At this liberal arts institution known for its strong commitment to undergraduate education, I consulted closely with Ruth Shoge, Associate Professor, College Librarian, and Adam Goodheart, Director of the College’s C.V. Starr Center for the Study of the American Experience, among others, to help bring the acclaimed Archive of Americana collections to their campus.
Archive of Americana transports you through time into 18th- and 19th-century America

Early American Newspapers, Series 1: Key Titles and Their Nameplates

Artist: Joseph H. Davis (1811-1865). Title: Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Otis and Child (1834). Source: Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Focusing on the 18th and early 19th centuries, the first series of Early American Newspapers offers over 350,000 issues from more than 710 titles. This widely used digital collection, based primarily on Clarence S. Brigham's authoritative "History and Bibliography of American Newspapers, 1690-1820," contains newspapers from 23 states and the District of Columbia. Below is a brief description—and the nameplate—of several key titles:

Albany Register (New York) One of the most successful and influential American newspapers of the late 18th and early 19th century, the Register was edited from 1808 to 1822 by the ardent anti-Federalist Solomon Southwick.

Early American Newspapers, Series 1: Key Titles and Their Nameplates

The Digital Detective: Tracking Criminals When the Trail Runs Cold (by Stephen Mihm)

[The article below by University of Georgia professor Stephen Mihm first appeared in The Readex Report (Sept. 2008). Last month, an op-ed by Mihm headlined "The Biographer's New Best Friend" was published in The New York Times Sunday Review section. In his Times piece, Mihm quotes historians and biographers James McGrath Morris, Joshua Kendall and Graham Hodges to help explain why "Readex's America's Historical Newspapers...has the potential to revolutionize biographical research."]

The Digital Detective: Tracking Criminals When the Trail Runs Cold

By Stephen Mihm, Associate Professor of History, University of Georgia

The Digital Detective: Tracking Criminals When the Trail Runs Cold (by Stephen Mihm)

Announcing a Readex Online Seminar: Newspaper Archives for Academic Research and Teaching

Readex now offers complimentary 45-minute Webinars led by experts in the history and academic use of newspaper archives. We invite you and your colleagues to register for a lively fall session in which you’ll learn about the fascinating and unique histories of a series of major American newspapers.

We’ll also explore such topics as:

Announcing a Readex Online Seminar: Newspaper Archives for Academic Research and Teaching

Celebrating National Hispanic Heritage Month: Hispanic American Newspapers, 1808-1980

 

 

Title: Native dance by Spanish-American. Fiesta, Taos, New Mexico. Photographer: Russell Lee (1903-1986). Source: Farm Security Administration - Office of War Information Photograph Collection (Library of Congress)

National Hispanic Heritage Month—approved by President Lyndon Johnson and expanded in 1988 by President Ronald Reagan—runs from September 15 to October 15. In addition to providing a special opportunity to celebrate Hispanic culture, Hispanic Heritage Month serves to highlight the long and important presence of Hispanic Americans in North America.

Celebrating National Hispanic Heritage Month: Hispanic American Newspapers, 1808-1980

Religion and the Rise of the Second Ku Klux Klan, 1915-1922 (by Kelly J. Baker)

[This article by Kelly J. Baker, who currently teaches American and religious studies at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, first appeared in the September 2009 issue of The Readex Report. Baker is also an editor of the Religion in American History blog. Her first book, Gospel According to the Klan: The KKK’s Appeal to Protestant America, 1915–1930, is being published this month by the University Press of Kansas.]

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“An original and sobering work” -- David Morgan, author of Protestants and Pictures

Religion and the Rise of the Second Ku Klux Klan, 1915-1922 (by Kelly J. Baker)

"A Dastardly Outrage": Kate Brown and the Washington-Alexandria Railroad Case

[Kate Brown, a U.S. Senate laundress promoted to retiring room attendant, is most notable for winning the 1873 Supreme Court Case Railroad Company v. Brown. This spring Brown was the focus of a winning entry in a research competition sponsored by the Oxford African American Studies Center and the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History. That winning entry on Brown, which will be published in the online African American National Biography, was researched and written by McLean (VA) High School students Brian Tong and Theodore Lin, who utilized the U.S. Congressional Serial Set among other sources. The article on Kate Brown below was written by Betty K. Koed, Assistant Historian in the U.S. Senate Historical Office. It appeared in the September 2008 issue of The Readex Report, where it was published with permission from Unum, a newsletter published by the Office of the Secretary of the United States Senate.]
"A Dastardly Outrage": Kate Brown and the Washington-Alexandria Railroad Case

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