Collection Development


The United Nations as Teacher

Suppose there were an information source from which you could learn practically everything about how the world’s 191 countries operate?  What makes these global citizens tick?  Why do they do what they do? Why, for instance, did Saddam Hussein invade Kuwait in the first place?  And why did some military experts and historians compare that invasion to Hitler’s conquest of Czechoslovakia in 1938?  How did the 1994 civil war in Rwanda result in the massacre of half a million people?  What forces keep the Middle East in perpetual turmoil?
The United Nations as Teacher

Rare FBIS Annexes now available online

FBIS Daily Report Annexes, 1974-1996 is an essential complement to FBIS Daily Reportsthe fully searchable broadcast and news resource featuring first-hand reporting from around the globe. This new international archive offers an additional 7,500 items, each designated "For Official Use Only" and previously unavailable outside the intelligence community and other Federal agencies. The Annexes were not an item in the Federal Depository Library Program, which distributed the Daily Report in microfiche from 1978 to 1996. No institution other than the Central Intelligence Agency holds all of the Annexes.
Rare FBIS Annexes now available online

The Police in Revolt? The Jails Open? Four Views of Mexico on November 25th, 1911

“The Police, in Revolt; the Jails, Open; the Nation, in Riot; the Families, in Dismay” – Thus runs the headline of Mexico’s El Diario on November 25th, 1911, as the Mexican Revolution raged in the capital.  As we celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month, it is both sobering and edifying to look back at the Revolution that shook Mexico a century ago, the reverberations of which would be felt across the Americas for decades.

From Latin American Newspapers. Click to enlarge.

It is especially edifying to look back at this revolution from the many perspectives that can be found in the newspapers of both Mexico and the United States. On the same day, November 25th, 1911, El Imparcial took a very different view of the situation—not surprisingly, as it was a propaganda organ of Mexico’s embattled dictator, Porfirio Diaz.

The Police in Revolt? The Jails Open? Four Views of Mexico on November 25th, 1911

Newspapers: "the rough draft of history"

Paper: The State; Date: Dec. 5, 1905; Issue 5302; Page 1; Columbia, South Carolina

Newspapers: "the rough draft of history"

America's Historical Newspapers reviewed in new issue of Journal of American History

The September 2010 issue of the Journal of American History—the quarterly journal of the Organization of American Historians—features this review of America's Historical Newspapers

America's Historical Newspapers reviewed in new issue of Journal of American History

Exploring Mexico's Revolutions in American Newspapers

This year marks the 200th anniversary of the initial uprising that would lead to the independence of Mexico from Spain.  2010 is also the 100th anniversary of the Mexican revolution of 1910, which overthrew President Porfirio Diaz.  Both revolutions lasted around a decade. The 1810 uprising is traditionally thought to have begun on September 16. This article published on December 20, 1810 in Boston’s Independent Chronicle shows how early news of the uprising was presented in the United States. It’s short and to the point.
On February 23, 1811, Baltimore’s Federal Gazette contained this translation of an article from the November 20, 1810 issue of the Spanish-language Mexico Gazette. The original article is a first-person account by Brigadier Don Felix Calleja of his actions in the field against the insurgents. Everything traveled slowly then, not just news. Publishers had no fear of reprinting materials from wherever they could get them.

Exploring Mexico's Revolutions in American Newspapers

Who Wants Yesterday's Papers? We Do!

Where do all those papers in Readex’s America’s Historical Newspapers come from? The majority of the issues in the seven series of Early American Newspapers were originally filmed over many decades in partnership with the American Antiquarian Society in Worcester, Massachusetts. However, a variety of libraries, museums, universities, and historical societies have also contributed a great many issues, as have several current-day publishers with historical back files.

From America's Historical Newspapers

Who Wants Yesterday's Papers? We Do!

Women's Suffrage: The Frontier Background

"Spirit of the Frontier" by John Gast (1872)

Women's Suffrage: The Frontier Background

Right to vote for U.S. women approved August 1920

 

Proposing the 19th Amendment

In her recent NewYork Times column titled "My Favorite August," Gail Collins wrote about women getting the right to vote in August 1920.  The previous year—on May 19, 1919—both Houses of the 66th Congress had approved House Joint Resolution 1, proposing the 19th amendment to the 48 states. The Joint Resolution was only two sentences long: 
"The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of sex. "Congress shall have power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation." 
The following summer, on August 18, Tennessee became the 36th state to ratify what many referred to as the "Susan B. Anthony federal suffrage amendment."

Right to vote for U.S. women approved August 1920

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