Digital Scholarship


American Mystery Meat: Unriddling the Mince Pie

[This article by the late Clifford J. Doerksen—who presented "bad news from the past" in his dark and witty blog, The Hope Chest—appeared in the November 2010 issue of The Readex Report.  A brilliant historian and critic, Cliff died unexpectedly last month at the age of 47.  Remembrances from his many fans and friends can be found at the Chicago Reader. ]

American Mystery Meat: Unriddling the Mince Pie

Readex to Launch Ethnic American Newspapers from the Balch Collection, 1799-1971

Readex distributed this press release on January 5.

Readex to Launch Ethnic American Newspapers from the Balch Collection, 1799-1971

Partnership with the leading ethnic research center in the U.S. presents new opportunities to explore the American immigrant experience

Readex to Launch Ethnic American Newspapers from the Balch Collection, 1799-1971

Washington Crosses the Delaware River: A Unique Christmas Tradition

Washington Crossing the Delaware (1851) by American painter Emanuel Gottlieb Leutze (Source: Metropolitan Museum of Art)

No Christmas celebration would be complete without Santa Claus, carols and George Washington. Wait, George Washington? What does he have to do with Christmas, you might ask? Well, quite a bit if you live near the site where General George Washington and his soldiers crossed the Delaware River on Christmas night in 1776. Each year at Pennsylvania’s Washington Crossing Historic Park, a group of dedicated Revolutionary War re-enactors and history enthusiasts gather to recreate Washington’s famous Christmas-night river crossing. The participants brave the cold dressed in authentic reproduction clothing and use replicas of the same kind of boats Washington and his men would have used. This year will mark the 234th anniversary of their daring crossing and pivotal victory the next day at the Battle of Trenton.

Washington Crosses the Delaware River: A Unique Christmas Tradition

A Light on Past Lives: The Illuminating Effects of Electronic Resources on Biographical Research

[This post by James McGrath Morris, author of Pulitzer: A Life in Politics, Print, and Power (HarperCollins, 2010), first appeared in the November 2010 issue of The Readex Report.]

A Light on Past Lives: The Illuminating Effects of Electronic Resources on Biographical Research

Newest Issue of The Readex Report Now Available: November 2010

In this issue: how digitized newspapers shine a brilliant light on past lives; the profound impact of religion on African-American identity; the Boston Tea Party as perceived by both Colonialists and those loyal to the Crown; and the humor, hype and horror behind the mysterious minced pie. A Light on Past Lives: The Illuminating Effects of Electronic Resources on Biographical Research By James McGrath Morris, author of Pulitzer: A Life in Politics, Print, and Power (HarperCollins, 2010) American Mystery Meat: Unriddling the Mince Pie
Newest Issue of The Readex Report Now Available: November 2010

Searching for Ancient Dead in the Modern Age

Our guest blogger today is SJ Wolfe, Senior Cataloguer at the American Antiquarian Society and Independent Mummyologist 

SJ Wolfe and 19th-century mummy Padihershef

Searching for Ancient Dead in the Modern Age

Meddlesome Medals?

What do the following seven people have in common: Osagyefo Kwame Nkrumah, Peter Ayodele Curtis Joseph, Modibo Keita, Shafie Ahmed el-Sheikh, Samora Machel, Agostinho Neto, Sam Nujoma and Nelson Mandela?  Well surely many things indeed.  For example, if you said they were all important African leaders in the second half of the twentieth century, you would be correct.  Each, however, in addition to any other commonalities, received the Lenin Peace Prize—the Soviet Union’s counterpart to the Nobel Peace Prize. Articles and radio broadcasts monitored, translated, and published in the Foreign Broadcast Information Service (FBIS) Daily Reports discuss the Lenin Peace Prize awards.  By searching on the phrase “Lenin Peace Prize” and limiting results to items from Africa, one gets 22 results in the Readex digital edition of FBIS Daily Reports and Annexes, 1941-1996. Searching for “Lenin Peace Prize” in the Readex database without limiting results by location retrieves some 268 results. Here is one example from the Accra Ghana Domestic Service on how the award was perceived in that country in 1962.
Meddlesome Medals?

"Anything Goes!": The 30th Anniversary of the Charleston Conference

If you’ll be attending the 2010 Charleston Conference next week, please schedule a visit with Readex at the Vendor Showcase on Wednesday afternoon. It’s a great opportunity to learn more about important new Supplements from the Library Company of Philadelphia to Early American Imprints (Evans and Shaw-Shoemaker) as well as major new modules for FBIS Daily Reports and the U.S. Congressional Serial Set. Also explore African American Newspapers, 1827-1998; 20th-Century American Newspapers, 1923 forward; and the World Newspaper Archive, including historical African, Latin American and South Asian newspapers. On Saturday, you may wish to attend a session entitled Straight Talk, described this way:
"Anything Goes!": The 30th Anniversary of the Charleston Conference

Exploring the Language of the Popular in Anglo-American Newspapers, 1833-1988

AHRC RESEARCH NETWORK – CALL FOR PAPERS

Principal Investigator Dr Martin Conboy, Department of Journalism Studies, University of Sheffield

Exploring the Language of the Popular in Anglo-American Newspapers, 1833-1988

The Police in Revolt? The Jails Open? Four Views of Mexico on November 25th, 1911

“The Police, in Revolt; the Jails, Open; the Nation, in Riot; the Families, in Dismay” – Thus runs the headline of Mexico’s El Diario on November 25th, 1911, as the Mexican Revolution raged in the capital.  As we celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month, it is both sobering and edifying to look back at the Revolution that shook Mexico a century ago, the reverberations of which would be felt across the Americas for decades.

From Latin American Newspapers. Click to enlarge.

It is especially edifying to look back at this revolution from the many perspectives that can be found in the newspapers of both Mexico and the United States. On the same day, November 25th, 1911, El Imparcial took a very different view of the situation—not surprisingly, as it was a propaganda organ of Mexico’s embattled dictator, Porfirio Diaz.

The Police in Revolt? The Jails Open? Four Views of Mexico on November 25th, 1911

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