Digital Scholarship


"Tears in England": Will World Cup History Repeat Itself?

From the Springfield Union, July 1, 1950, page 18

England will meet the United States in the first game either team plays in the 2010 World Cup. The tournament begins this Friday, June 11, with the England vs. U.S. game occurring Saturday afternoon in the Eastern Time zone. The first time the two teams met produced a stunning upset in 1950. The Springfield Union quoted British newspapers as saying that the loss "marks the lowest ever for British sport," and "is the biggest soccer upset of all time." A reporter for the U.K.’s Daily Graphic wrote: "It was pathetic to see the cream of English players beaten by a side (team) most amateur players at home would have beaten..." A search within 20th-Century American Newspapers on "World Cup" and "soccer" in the year 1950 reveals only 10 articles in the pages of eight major U.S. papers. In contrast, this year ESPN and its family of networks will be broadcasting every game from the tournament. Times, and American interest in the sport, have changed.
"Tears in England": Will World Cup History Repeat Itself?

The Charleston Advisor awards Early American Newspapers 4.75 stars

The April 2010 issue of The Charleston Advisor includes a two-page review of America's Historical Newspapers by Providence College librarian Janice Schuster. Focusing on Early American Newspapers, Series 1 to 7, 1690-1922, The Charleston Advisor awarded this collection its highest ranking in the categories of Content, Searchability and Contract Options. Here’s an excerpt:
"The initial search screen makes it very clear which searching options are available. One can immediately start searching using the Google-like search box and the drop-down menu of searching options, including Headline, Standard Title (i.e., publication title), and Title as published....The results list includes a wealth of information for each item, including title of publication; publication date; published as; location; headline, and article type....The results list also includes a thumbnail image (actually larger than a thumbnail) of a portion of the article. This facilitates research by making it easy to browse through and eliminate irrelevant items....
The Charleston Advisor awards Early American Newspapers 4.75 stars

The Pope’s Stone: Part One

From the Serial Set: History of the Washington National Monument and Washington National Monument Society. Compiled by Frederick L. Harvey, Secretary Washington National Monument Society. February 6, 1903

The Pope’s Stone: Part One

Defying Destiny, Dirty Politics, Revolutionary News and 19th-Century Mummymania: The Readex Report, Volume 5, Issue 2

In the current issue of The Readex Report...

Tom Standage, Economist business affairs editor, describes how nineteenth-century newspapers survived a disruptive technology in Defying Destiny;

LeeAnna Keith, history teacher at New York City's Collegiate School, pieces together dirty politics in Reconstruction-era Louisiana in Following the Trail of a Deep South Massacre;

Goucher College history professor Matthew Hale explores the relationship between English Romantic poet William Wordsworth and American newspapers during the French Revolution in Measuring Time in a Blissful Dawn;

Defying Destiny, Dirty Politics, Revolutionary News and 19th-Century Mummymania: The Readex Report, Volume 5, Issue 2

Electronic Resources that Help Illuminate Past Lives

Increasingly, a writer attempting to produce the definitive biography of a 19th or 20th-century American will find that essential tools include searchable databases of government documents and newspapers. T.J. Stiles, author of The First Tycoon: The Epic Life of Cornelius Vanderbilt (2009, Alfred A. Knopf), which recently won the National Book Award, was able to utilize the digital edition of the U.S. Congressional Serial Set to uncover vindicating facts about the patriotism of his often maligned subject. In his article “Commodore Vanderbilt: Patriot or War Profiteer?,” Stiles writes:

I was ready to indict and convict Vanderbilt of war profiteering, if that’s where the evidence led me. Instead, it convinced me that the Commodore deserved his gold medal. Vanderbilt has often been treated with cynicism by historians, who are ready to believe the worst of a staggeringly rich, secretive, and combative man. Certainly I did not set out to rehabilitate his reputation. But I couldn’t ignore the evidence—evidence provided in breathtaking abundance by Congress in its Serial Set, now more accessible than ever thanks to digitization.

Electronic Resources that Help Illuminate Past Lives

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