Historical Newspapers


The Worst Day for Casualties in British Military History: A Look Back at the Battle of the Somme through Early American Newspapers

July 1, 2016, marks the 100th anniversary of the day the British army suffered the worst losses in its history, the first day of the Battle of the Somme. American newspapers and news services had correspondents in Britain, France and Germany, who were the main opponents on the Western Front, covering the events of the war. This was possible because the United States had not yet entered the war. Readex’s Early American Newspapers contains the accounts those correspondents filed about this battle as well as the rest of World War I.

July 1, 1916: After five days of an artillery barrage intended to destroy the barbed wire and thin out the German defenders, officers blew their whistles at 7:30 a.m. and the British troops went over the top. The plan by the commanding generals was that this attack would cut through the German lines and turn a static war back into a war of movement. Originally expected to be led by French forces, the lengthy battle of Verdun shifted the main attack to the British sector. Planned in late 1915, the attack was planned to coincide with the Brusilov Offensive on the Eastern Front in present-day western Ukraine. 

 

Bobmbardment before battle.jpg

 

The Worst Day for Casualties in British Military History: A Look Back at the Battle of the Somme through Early American Newspapers

The Memphis Massacre of 1866: As Seen through Local News Coverage and a Government Report found in the Archive of Americana

In the century following the end of the Civil War, brutal assaults on black people and their neighborhoods by mobs of white people, often described as "race riots," were intended, in part, to blunt the demand for equal rights and to enforce white supremacy on former slaves. Another goal was to drive former slaves back to plantations and out of urban areas. The first of these large-scale attacks took place in Memphis, Tennessee, in 1866. 

The terrible state of affairs, between the white and black races, which the teachings of the Radical extremists to the negro have caused the fear of, almost since the cessations of hostilities, commenced in our city about 6 o’clock yesterday, in serious and fatal earnest. The war began on South street, in the extreme southern portion of the Corporation. It originated from a difficulty between a white and negro boy, near the bridge over the bayou, on the street already mentioned.

The Memphis Massacre of 1866: As Seen through Local News Coverage and a Government Report found in the Archive of Americana

Exotic China, Canadian Blacks and a Forgotten American War: The Readex Report (April 2016)

In this issue: The first American vessel to reach exotic China sparks nationwide wonder; nineteenth-century Canadian blacks find their voice in the American press; and an unheralded hero from a forgotten American war. 


The “New People” in China: Using Historical Newspapers to Analyze America’s First Contacts with Asia

By Dane Morrison, Professor of Early American History, Salem State University 

Exotic China, Canadian Blacks and a Forgotten American War: The Readex Report (April 2016)

Learn the major benefits of Readex AllSearch, a new platform for searching across Readex collections

Join an upcoming training and discussion session on Readex AllSearch—a streamlined, mobile-friendly platform for efficiently searching across the Readex collections available at your institution. By consolidating digital collections and document types—historical imprints, newspapers, and government documents—Readex AllSearch enables users to make new and unexpected discoveries. Among the cross-searchable collections are America’s Historical Imprints, America’s Historical Newspapers, U.S. Congressional Serial Set, Foreign Broadcast Information Service Daily Reports, Joint Publications Resarch Service Reports, World Newspaper Archive and others. 

To be held on Thursday, April 28, from 2:00 to 2:45, this session provides an overview of the fully integrated AllSearch platform; its relationship to individual Readex collections; the benefits of cross-searching multiple families of Readex collections; and common teaching and research applications. Training covers key features of the platform, including simple and advanced searching, collection selection, results lists, and document viewing. Also covered are workflow features and the mobile-friendly design.  

Learn the major benefits of Readex AllSearch, a new platform for searching across Readex collections

Broadening History: A Conversation with Manisha Sinha (VIDEO)

Readex recently sat down with Manisha Sinha, Professor of Afro-American Studies at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. Sinha discussed her extensive new history of abolition and the importance of having access to broad digital collections. She also offered valuable advice to students beginning a research project of their own. 

For more information about The American Slavery Collection, Early American Newspapers or African American Newspapers, please contact readexmarketing@readex.com.

Broadening History: A Conversation with Manisha Sinha (VIDEO)

Benjamin Pogrund on the Rand Daily Mail: Former Deputy Editor Reflects on the Newspaper’s Critical Role in the Anti-Apartheid Movement

Guest post by

Benjamin Pogrund, former deputy editor, Rand Daily Mail

[Editor’s note: For decades Benjamin Pogrund served as the Rand Daily Mail’s African Affairs Reporter. He closely covered the issues and events that profoundly impacted South Africa’s black population, including the 1960 Sharpeville massacre. Pogrund later served as Deputy Editor from 1977 until the Mail’s closure in 1985. In the comments below, Pogrund—recipient of the 2005-06 Dr. Jean Mayer Global Citizenship Award—provides firsthand insight into the outsized role the Rand Daily Mail played during the struggle to end apartheid.] 

The Rand Daily Mail was ahead of its time in reporting and exposing apartheid evils and in opposing oppressive government. This is why it was shut down. 

Benjamin Pogrund on the Rand Daily Mail: Former Deputy Editor Reflects on the Newspaper’s Critical Role in the Anti-Apartheid Movement

“Destined for success”: 1960 Newspaper Reviews of Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird

Harper Lee (1926-2016)World-famous for her debut novel—and until last year her only novel—Harper Lee took America by storm in 1960 when To Kill a Mockingbird was published.

Unlike now classic works that were published to lackluster reviews, including F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby, Lee’s enduring story of racial injustice in a small Southern town received immediate praise in newspapers across the United States.

The Boston Herald wrote:

This is a book which the reader will thoroughly enjoy, a book overflowing with life, and warm laughter; one that holds understanding in its heart and passes it on to the absorbed reader. 

From the Boston Herald (July 10, 1960)

 

The Dallas Morning News stated: 

“Destined for success”: 1960 Newspaper Reviews of Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird

Watch the New Video: “Did Abolitionists Cause the Civil War?” by Manisha Sinha

For the past ten years, Manisha Sinha has immersed herself in the 19th century and the world of abolitionists. The fruits of Sinha’s scholarship, a comprehensive history of the abolition movement, The Slave's Cause: A History of Abolition (Yale University Press, 2016), arrives in bookstores this month.

Her work is already challenging some of the conventional ideas associated with abolition. For example, Sinha—Professor of Afro-American Studies and History at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst—extends the movement’s chronological boundaries to the 18th century and demonstrates that abolition was a radical movement that involved many issues in addition to the emancipation of slaves. Perhaps most importantly, Sinha also brings light to the largely forgotten impact on the abolition movement of free and enslaved African Americans.   

Speaking at a Readex breakfast event during the American Library Association Midwinter Meeting in Boston earlier this month, Sinha shared the major findings of her decade-long dive into abolition history and how she went about conducting research for the book. In the full presentation, Sinha describes her many trips to repositories to review physical documents, and even joked the time she spent at the American Antiquarian Society—which she describes as “the best place to do research”—almost reached the level of an occupation.

“They got me there for a year on an NEH fellowship, and I never left!” Sinha told the audience.

Watch the New Video: “Did Abolitionists Cause the Civil War?” by Manisha Sinha

Interface Training: Make the Most of Your Readex Collections

Readex interface training sessions present a brief overview of collection content, highlight key interface features and functionality, and offer suggestions for classroom instruction. Specific examples of how faculty and students use the content are also provided. Sessions are organized around major Readex collection families. Register today for one or more today. 

 

America’s Historical Newspapers and World Newspaper Archive

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Collections covered include Early American Newspapers, African American Newspapers, Hispanic American Newspapers, Ethnic American Newspapers, Caribbean Newspapers, American Newspaper Archive and the World Newspaper Archive.  

 

America's Historical Imprints

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Collections covered include Afro-Americana Imprints, American Civil War Collection, American Pamphlets, American Slavery Collection, Early American Imprints, African History and Culture, Black Authors, Caribbean History and Culture, and American Broadsides and Ephemera.  

 

Interface Training: Make the Most of Your Readex Collections

An Independence-Minded Ally, Wistful Postbellum Memoirs, and a Forgotten Comic-Strip Savant: The Readex Report (November 2015)

In this issue: the heralded 19th-century return of an independence-minded ally; wresting insight from wistful Postbellum memoirs; and an entire genre fueled by a forgotten comic-strip savant.


Lafayette’s Return: An Early American Media Event

By Jonathan Wilfred Wilson, Adjunct Instructor, Department of History, University of Scranton

In summer 2015, a wooden frigate named the Hermione sailed from France to the United States. It was recreating one of the voyages that brought the Marquis de Lafayette to fight in the American War of Independence. The new Hermione was a painstaking replica of Lafayette’s ship, built with authentic eighteenth-century methods. Its voyage, however, became a modern multimedia spectacle—with international television coverage, a website, and a busy Twitter account. > Full Story 


Reading between the Lines: Exploring Postbellum Plantation Memoirists through Digitized Newspaper Collections

An Independence-Minded Ally, Wistful Postbellum Memoirs, and a Forgotten Comic-Strip Savant: The Readex Report (November 2015)

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