American History


Civil War Imagery on Clipper Ship Sailing Cards

Our guest blogger today is Bruce D. Roberts, author of Clipper Ship Sailing Cards (2007) and Mechanical Bank Trade Cards (2008). His new article on "The Development of the American Advertising Card" appears in the April 2011 issue of The Readex Report.

In the mid-nineteenth century, clipper ships sailed from New York and Boston to San Francisco. Shipping lines advertised voyages of clipper ships via sailing cards, most of which were issued between 1856 and 1868. The American Civil War fell right in the middle of this span, and Civil War imagery is seen on many cards. The examples below are found in American Broadsides and Ephemera, Series I, a Readex digital archive created in partnership with the American Antiquarian Society.

Invincible

Civil War Imagery on Clipper Ship Sailing Cards

Select historical newspapers published in cities, states, regions or any combination

From Maine to California, the most comprehensive collection of U.S. newspapers published in the 18th, 19th and 20th centuries is America’s Historical Newspapers. Continually expanding, this unique online resource features thousands of historical newspapers published in more than 450 cities from Alaska to Florida. And now, you can create your own customized collection from all available titles published in any U.S. region, state, or city. Easily build a custom collection that meets your institution's budget America's Historical Newspapers Select is an essential tool for many types of historical research. Students and faculty can easily search any combination of titles within a single, easy-to-use interface, and when your institution’s needs expand, titles from additional locations can be added at any time. Consider any custom configuration, including: • Appalachian states • Coastal Colonial cities • Confederate States of America • Deep South • Ghost Towns • Great Plains • Maryland, Virginia, and Washington, D.C. • New Jersey, New York City and Philadelphia • New Orleans and Mobile • Rocky Mountain states • West Coast
Select historical newspapers published in cities, states, regions or any combination

Best of the Readex Blog: A 2010 Sampler

In 2010 our 20 bloggers combined for more than 70 posts on a wide-range of topics related to the use of digital resources for historical research. Did you miss any of these during the past year? 

The United Nations as Teacher by Ed Beckwith

A Future That Never Arrived by Bruce Coggeshall

Best of the Readex Blog: A 2010 Sampler

An Undergraduate's Reflections on Original American History Research: How Online Access to Historical Newspapers Helped Prepare an Award-Winning Tea Party Study

 [This post by David Brooks, a recent graduate of Taylor University, first appeared in the November 2010 issue of The Readex Report.]

An Undergraduate's Reflections on Original American History Research: How Online Access to Historical Newspapers Helped Prepare an Award-Winning Tea Party Study

Explore Our Newest Resources at the American Library Association Midwinter Conference

Learn more about new Readex collections for 2011, including African American Periodicals from the Wisconsin Historical Society, 1825-1970, by visiting us next month in San Diego at NewsBank booth 2432. To explore the recently released resources below, please either stop by our booth or email us today at sales@readex.com. New in 2010 America’s Historical Imprints, 1639-1900 Now supplemented with 2,000 documents from the Library Company of Philadelphia, this single new interface for five related collections features over 100,000 early American books, pamphlets and other rare printed materials. FBIS Daily Report Annexes, 1974-1996
Explore Our Newest Resources at the American Library Association Midwinter Conference

The End of an Era: The Final Voyage of Space Shuttle Discovery

The 1988 return to flight launch of the Space Shuttle Discovery (Source: NASA Images)

The highly anticipated launch of space shuttle Discovery later this month will mark the beginning of an end. The United States’ era of launching manned space vehicles is almost over, or, at least, nearing a lengthy pause.  Following the final Discovery launch, only one remaining shuttle mission is planned. After that, government funding looks likely—but not definite—for one more launch.  Once the space shuttles are retired, the U.S. will relinquish its position as one of three countries with manned flight capability; only China and Russia will continue to have the capability to launch manned space vehicles.  The shuttle program kicked off a novel concept in space flight: reusable space vehicles. No longer would single-use rockets carry man and machinery into the final frontier. Instead, a craft capable of take off (albeit propelled by external fuel tanks), maneuverability in space, and re-entry and landing would revolutionize the industry. 

The End of an Era: The Final Voyage of Space Shuttle Discovery

Ships Ahoy! They don't make ships like this anymore

From America's Historical Newspapers

Contrary to this newspaper report that the event would take place in November 1797, the frigate USS Constitution was actually christened and launched at Boston’s naval shipyards the previous month on October 21—213 years ago this fall. During the course of the next two weeks in 1797, a number of newspapers wrote or republished articles about the launching, including the Norwich Packet:

From America's Historical Newspapers (Click image to read full article.)

Ships Ahoy! They don't make ships like this anymore

Women's Suffrage: The Frontier Background

"Spirit of the Frontier" by John Gast (1872)

Women's Suffrage: The Frontier Background

Illustrated Journalism: The Innovative Use of Maps by Northern Newspapers to Report Civil War Events

First map of Battle of Gettysburg, showing first day’s fighting. (Phil. Inquirer; July 4, 1863)

Illustrated Journalism: The Innovative Use of Maps by Northern Newspapers to Report Civil War Events

If At First You Do Not Succeed: Walt Disney Introduces Mickey Mouse (May 15, 1928)

To say that iconic brands are prevalent in today’s society is a bit of an understatement. Everywhere you look, there’s a sign for a name brand, a store, a large company. It may be hard to imagine a time when this wasn’t the case—when not only was that big name unknown, but it was rejected. Take Disney for example: Can you think of a time when Mickey Mouse wasn’t an icon for family fun? If you’ve grown up in the United States within the last, say, 70 years or so, chances are that you may have seen this mouse a time or two! Looking back at those early years though, Walt Disney didn’t always find success. In fact, in the late 1920s the combination of Mickey Mouse and Disney was a gamble that few were willing to take.

From the Plain Dealer, Cleveland, Ohio, May 1, 1955

If At First You Do Not Succeed: Walt Disney Introduces Mickey Mouse (May 15, 1928)

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