American History


Ships Ahoy! They don't make ships like this anymore

From America's Historical Newspapers

Contrary to this newspaper report that the event would take place in November 1797, the frigate USS Constitution was actually christened and launched at Boston’s naval shipyards the previous month on October 21—213 years ago this fall. During the course of the next two weeks in 1797, a number of newspapers wrote or republished articles about the launching, including the Norwich Packet:

From America's Historical Newspapers (Click image to read full article.)

Ships Ahoy! They don't make ships like this anymore

Women's Suffrage: The Frontier Background

"Spirit of the Frontier" by John Gast (1872)

Women's Suffrage: The Frontier Background

Illustrated Journalism: The Innovative Use of Maps by Northern Newspapers to Report Civil War Events

First map of Battle of Gettysburg, showing first day’s fighting. (Phil. Inquirer; July 4, 1863)

Illustrated Journalism: The Innovative Use of Maps by Northern Newspapers to Report Civil War Events

If At First You Do Not Succeed: Walt Disney Introduces Mickey Mouse (May 15, 1928)

To say that iconic brands are prevalent in today’s society is a bit of an understatement. Everywhere you look, there’s a sign for a name brand, a store, a large company. It may be hard to imagine a time when this wasn’t the case—when not only was that big name unknown, but it was rejected. Take Disney for example: Can you think of a time when Mickey Mouse wasn’t an icon for family fun? If you’ve grown up in the United States within the last, say, 70 years or so, chances are that you may have seen this mouse a time or two! Looking back at those early years though, Walt Disney didn’t always find success. In fact, in the late 1920s the combination of Mickey Mouse and Disney was a gamble that few were willing to take.

From the Plain Dealer, Cleveland, Ohio, May 1, 1955

If At First You Do Not Succeed: Walt Disney Introduces Mickey Mouse (May 15, 1928)

Defying Destiny, Dirty Politics, Revolutionary News and 19th-Century Mummymania: The Readex Report, Volume 5, Issue 2

In the current issue of The Readex Report...

Tom Standage, Economist business affairs editor, describes how nineteenth-century newspapers survived a disruptive technology in Defying Destiny;

LeeAnna Keith, history teacher at New York City's Collegiate School, pieces together dirty politics in Reconstruction-era Louisiana in Following the Trail of a Deep South Massacre;

Goucher College history professor Matthew Hale explores the relationship between English Romantic poet William Wordsworth and American newspapers during the French Revolution in Measuring Time in a Blissful Dawn;

Defying Destiny, Dirty Politics, Revolutionary News and 19th-Century Mummymania: The Readex Report, Volume 5, Issue 2

Join Readex to Hear James McGrath Morris and Steven Daniel at the 2010 American Library Association Annual Conference

Will you be attending the American Library Association conference this summer?  If so, make a date with Readex to attend a special breakfast event focusing on the use of digital resources for historical research.

Photo by Michael Mudd

Join Readex to Hear James McGrath Morris and Steven Daniel at the 2010 American Library Association Annual Conference

Instant Access to our Award-Winning Civil War Collection Still Available

From The Daily Picayune; 04-15-1865; New Orleans

One hundred and forty-five years ago this month, two of the most critical events in American history occurred within five days of one another. On April 9, General R. E. Lee surrendered the battered Army of Northern Virginia to Union forces under the command of General Ulysses S. Grant. Five days later, President Abraham Lincoln was shot by John Wilkes Booth and died the next day. Learn about these events and many more in The Civil War: Antebellum Period to Reconstruction—a Choice 2010 Outstanding Academic Title.

Instant Access to our Award-Winning Civil War Collection Still Available

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