American Library Association


And the Winners of the 2011 GODORT Silent Auction Are...

Congratulations to Peggy Lewis, Miami University, and Joan Parker, University of Delaware, winners of the 2011 GODORT Silent Auction for the W. David Rozkuszka Scholarship.
And the Winners of the 2011 GODORT Silent Auction Are...

What's New at Readex - Summer 2011

To explore our newest collections, please visit Readex at booth 3140 at the 2011 American Library Association conference. Or visit readex.com for detailed product information about these uniquely valuable resources:
What's New at Readex - Summer 2011

Bid Today! 2011 Silent Auction Now Open in Support of GODORT Scholarship

Established in 1994, the W. David Rozkuszka Scholarship provides financial assistance to an individual who is 1) currently working with government documents in a library and 2) trying to complete a master’s degree in library science.
Bid Today! 2011 Silent Auction Now Open in Support of GODORT Scholarship

Best of the Readex Blog: A 2010 Sampler

In 2010 our 20 bloggers combined for more than 70 posts on a wide-range of topics related to the use of digital resources for historical research. Did you miss any of these during the past year? 

The United Nations as Teacher by Ed Beckwith

A Future That Never Arrived by Bruce Coggeshall

Best of the Readex Blog: A 2010 Sampler

Explore Our Newest Resources at the American Library Association Midwinter Conference

Learn more about new Readex collections for 2011, including African American Periodicals from the Wisconsin Historical Society, 1825-1970, by visiting us next month in San Diego at NewsBank booth 2432. To explore the recently released resources below, please either stop by our booth or email us today at sales@readex.com. New in 2010 America’s Historical Imprints, 1639-1900 Now supplemented with 2,000 documents from the Library Company of Philadelphia, this single new interface for five related collections features over 100,000 early American books, pamphlets and other rare printed materials. FBIS Daily Report Annexes, 1974-1996
Explore Our Newest Resources at the American Library Association Midwinter Conference

Announcing the Winners of the 2010 GODORT Silent Auction

Congratulations to Esther Crawford, Rice University, and Michelle McKnelly, University of Wisconsin-River Falls, winners of the 2010 GODORT Silent Auction for the W. David Rozkuszka Scholarship. Esther had the winning bid for the seven-day stay in Chester, Vermont, and Michelle won the four-day stay in Naples, Florida. Enjoy the getaways! Over $1,600 was raised to support the Rozkuszka Scholarship, which since 1994 has provided financial assistance to an individual currently working with government documents in a library and completing a master's degree in library science. GODORT and Readex would like to thank all the participants for their support of this worthy cause.
Announcing the Winners of the 2010 GODORT Silent Auction

Dredges, Gunboats, and Mosquitoes: The U.S. Congressional Serial Set and the Building of the Panama Canal

A Readex breakfast event during the 2010 American Library Association annual conference included a presentation by Steve Daniel, an internationally known authority on government documents. In "Dredges, Gunboats, and Mosquitoes," Daniel traced the history of the idea of a water route through Central America as it is documented in the U.S. Congressional Serial Set. Daniel writes:
"The building of the Panama Canal was without doubt one of the great engineering and technological achievements of the modern era, equal in every respect to the first transcontinental railroad and putting a man on the moon. Its completion in 1914 was the realization of a dream that dates back to the early years of European settlement in the New World. "Because of the Serial Set’s importance as a collection of legislative history materials, the even greater importance of the 19th and early 20th century Serial Set as a fundamental resource for research on the major and minor issues of American political, economic and social history is sometimes overlooked.  Highlighted here are only a small number of the hundreds of publications in in the Serial Set that might be cited on the Panama Canal." 
Here is Daniel’s PowerPoint. A video of his live presentation will be available here soon. Daniel adds:
"Whether it’s biographical research on Civil War generals and politicians, the history of civil rights and women’s suffrage in America, or the building an interoceanic canal, the Serial Set is a logical place to begin."
Dredges, Gunboats, and Mosquitoes: The U.S. Congressional Serial Set and the Building of the Panama Canal

Join Readex to Hear James McGrath Morris and Steven Daniel at the 2010 American Library Association Annual Conference

Will you be attending the American Library Association conference this summer?  If so, make a date with Readex to attend a special breakfast event focusing on the use of digital resources for historical research.

Photo by Michael Mudd

Join Readex to Hear James McGrath Morris and Steven Daniel at the 2010 American Library Association Annual Conference

Electronic Resources that Help Illuminate Past Lives

Increasingly, a writer attempting to produce the definitive biography of a 19th or 20th-century American will find that essential tools include searchable databases of government documents and newspapers. T.J. Stiles, author of The First Tycoon: The Epic Life of Cornelius Vanderbilt (2009, Alfred A. Knopf), which recently won the National Book Award, was able to utilize the digital edition of the U.S. Congressional Serial Set to uncover vindicating facts about the patriotism of his often maligned subject. In his article “Commodore Vanderbilt: Patriot or War Profiteer?,” Stiles writes:

I was ready to indict and convict Vanderbilt of war profiteering, if that’s where the evidence led me. Instead, it convinced me that the Commodore deserved his gold medal. Vanderbilt has often been treated with cynicism by historians, who are ready to believe the worst of a staggeringly rich, secretive, and combative man. Certainly I did not set out to rehabilitate his reputation. But I couldn’t ignore the evidence—evidence provided in breathtaking abundance by Congress in its Serial Set, now more accessible than ever thanks to digitization.

Electronic Resources that Help Illuminate Past Lives

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