campaigns


Contraband, Conspiracy, and Political Cartoons: New Works in The American Civil War Collection

154FE302DA7FE3C8.jpgThe current release of The American Civil War Collection, 1860-1922: From the American Antiquarian Society, includes:

  • an unusual Christmas story instructive of the need for faith,
  • an elaborate account of the conspiracy to assassinate Abraham Lincoln,
  • and a lithographic collection of caricatures, or political cartoons, from the years surrounding and including the Civil War.

Contraband Christmas. By N.W.T.R. With illustrations by Hoppin. (1864)

N.W.T.R are the initials for Nathaniel William Taylor Root (1829-1872) who appears to have been particularly interested in preparing Civil War-era boys for military service. The illustrator is Augustus Hoppin who has previously been featured here for his comical works Carrot-pomade and Hay Fever.

Contraband 1.jpg

This tale takes place in Rhode Island and entails the Greene family and their three children the eldest of whom is a soldier in the Union Army. When he had last visited his family on leave, he had brought with him a black man who remained with the family to whom he was introduced as Chrismus. When asked, he explained that his former master had named him thus because he was born on Christmas Day twenty years earlier.

Contraband, Conspiracy, and Political Cartoons: New Works in The American Civil War Collection

Announcing a 2016 ALA Breakfast Presentation: Dirty Politics in a Genteel Age, 1868-1892

During the upcoming American Library Association conference, Readex will host a special Sunday breakfast presentation. Prof. Mark Wahlgren Summers, an engaging speaker and highly praised authority on 19th-century U.S. political history, will present “Politics is just war without bayonets”: Dirty Politics in a Genteel Age, 1868-1892. 

About the Presentation

For most historians, the Gilded Age was the Golden Age of American Politics.  Well before football or baseball found a vogue, it was the great participatory sport.  Families turned out for parades, rallies and barbecues.  Campaign clubs designed ornate uniforms and hired brass bands to precede them as they marched.  Eligible voters in record numbers showed up at the polls—and sometimes at the polls of the state next door to theirs if it had a different election day.

Announcing a 2016 ALA Breakfast Presentation: Dirty Politics in a Genteel Age, 1868-1892

Back to top