Egypt


'In the Shadow of Conventions:' Gender Equality in Islamic Society

 

JPRS Women in the Middle East 3.jpg

JPRS Women in the Middle East 4.jpg

 

The scope of Joint Publications Research Service (JPRS) Reports, 1957-1995, is much broader than politics and national security; social issues are also well represented. In the four reports excerpted below we proceed from general to particular. The first, which includes the cartoons here, is a diverse collection of articles from Arabic-language sources; the second a travel diary of a woman visiting oases in Egypt. The third and fourth items both concern the conflict of Muslim traditions in the former Soviet Union—the latter report specifically with regard to the nomadic culture of Kazakhstan. Together they offer valuable insights into the role of women in Muslim countries, both in urban and rural settings.

The first report, Near East/North Africa Report, No. 2620, Status of women in Persian Gulf countries (JPRS-81769, 09/15/1982. 90 pages) touches upon such contemporary topics as age discrimination, suffrage, driving, marriage and divorce, employment, education, dress, and East/West cultural differences.

'In the Shadow of Conventions:' Gender Equality in Islamic Society

Special Prepublication Savings on FBIS Daily Reports, 1941-1974

From North Africa to the Middle East to South Asia and beyond

Since 1941 the U.S. Foreign Broadcast Information Service (FBIS) has been recording, transcribing and translating intercepted radio broadcasts from foreign governments, official news services, and clandestine broadcasts from occupied territories. Now a comprehensive digital edition of this unique archive is available for students and scholars of world history and political science. 

 

 The historical precedents to topics in today's headlines from Libya, Egypt and the Middle East

Special Prepublication Savings on FBIS Daily Reports, 1941-1974

The Muslim Brotherhood Through the FBIS Looking-Glass

Hassan al-Banna

The Muslim Brotherhood Through the FBIS Looking-Glass

Sayyid Qutb in the pages of the FBIS Daily Report and in The Economist's review of a new biography of Qutb

John Calvert’s forthcoming book Sayyid Qutb and the Origins of Radical Islamism (London: Hurst & Co., 2010) was anonymously and seemingly fairly reviewed in The Economist, July 15, 2010. Qutb, according to The Economist’s review, and I summarize here, flirted with Sufism but became a secular nationalist in the 1940s, opposed to British rule in Egypt and "Zionist colonization in Palestine." After completing his first major book, Social Justice in Islam, Qutb spent two years in the United States where, according to Calvert (or Calvert’s anonymous reviewer), his final conversion to radical Islamism was solidified. He returned to Egypt and joined the Muslim Brotherhood in 1953, a year after Gamal Abdel Nasser and a group of officers overthrew the pro-Western government of King Farouk. Following a 1954 assassination attempt on him, Nasser struck out against the Muslim Brotherhood, and Qutb was one of those arrested and tortured. While in prison he wrote not only his influential book Milestones but also a multi-volume commentary on the Qur’an. In 1966, largely for his statements in Milestones Qut’b was tried, convicted and hanged, thus becoming "a martyr for the cause." He continues to stir up passions as martyrs are wont to do. In the Foreign Broadcast Information Service (FBIS) Daily Report, published in print from 1941 to the third quarter of 1996 and now full-text digitally searchable in the Readex FBIS Daily Reports, we find many references to Sayyid Qutb which show to some degree both how he was perceived at the time and how his legacy was received and perhaps misconstrued by terrorist organizations like al-Quaeda.
Sayyid Qutb in the pages of the FBIS Daily Report and in The Economist's review of a new biography of Qutb

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