Journalism studies


‘Nobody had a doubt’: Fake News from the Past

The proliferation of fake news during and after the 2016 U.S. presidential election continues to make fresh headlines. Although today’s delivery system is different, the creation and sharing of fake news itself is not a new problem. Early American Newspapers, Series 1-13, contains dozens of mentions, as seen in these late 19th-century examples.

 

Fake News Cincinnati Commerical Tribune 12.04.1890.jpg

 

Fake News The New York Herald 07.15.1892.jpg

 

Fake News Jacksonian (Heber Springs, Arkansas 05.11.1893.jpg

 

Fake News Plain Dealer  04.10.1893.jpg

 

‘Nobody had a doubt’: Fake News from the Past

Surviving the Titanic: The Stories Behind the Story

No novelist would dare to picture such an array of beautiful climatic conditions—the rosy dawn, the morning star, the moon on the horizon, the sea stretching in level beauty to the skyline—and on this sea to place an ice-field like the Arctic regions and icebergs in numbers everywhere—white and turning pink and deadly cold,—and near them, rowing round the icebergs to avoid them, little boats coming suddenly out of the mid-ocean, with passengers rescued from the most wonderful ship the world has known. 

—Lawrence Beesley, The Loss of the S.S. Titanic (June 1912)

The Titanic. Source: George Grantham Bain Collection (Library of Congress).

Surviving the Titanic: The Stories Behind the Story

Announcing the digital edition of Washington, D.C.’s Evening Star, 1852-1922

Old Evening Star Building on Pennsylvania Avenue, Washington, D.C. -- Source: Carol M. Highsmith Archive (Library of Congress)

This spring Readex will begin releasing a complete 70-year span of The Evening Star—one of the most influential newspapers in U.S. history. For more than a century, historians have regarded The Evening Star as the newspaper of record for the nation’s capital. Today, curators from leading newspaper repositories cite this long-running afternoon daily as one of their most heavily researched papers.

Man buying The Evening Star from newsboy -- Source: National Photo Company Collection (Library of Congress)

Announcing the digital edition of Washington, D.C.’s Evening Star, 1852-1922

"Information Wanted" Advertisements: Searching for African American Family Members

Guest blogger: Reinette F. Jones, Librarian, Louis B. Nunn Center for Oral History, University of Kentucky

Source: University of Kentucky

"Information Wanted" Advertisements: Searching for African American Family Members

Researching Nat Turner's Slave Revolt in American (and African American) Newspapers

Nat Turner preaches religion. Image Credit: The Granger Collection, New York

Whites throughout the American South were traumatized in the summer of 1831 by a bloody slave revolt led by Nat Turner, a man his fellow slaves called “The Prophet.” By all accounts, Turner was an intelligent but peculiar man. Although education for slaves was widely outlawed, he taught himself to read as a young child and pored over the Bible. He often avoided people and spent much time fasting, praying, and preaching to other slaves. Turner believed he received visions from God—one vision instructed him to be an instrument of revenge against whites for their wicked ways.

The Capture of Nat Turner (1800-1831) by Benjamin Phipps on 30 October 1831

Researching Nat Turner's Slave Revolt in American (and African American) Newspapers

A Light on Past Lives: The Illuminating Effects of Electronic Resources on Biographical Research

[This post by James McGrath Morris, author of Pulitzer: A Life in Politics, Print, and Power (HarperCollins, 2010), first appeared in the November 2010 issue of The Readex Report.]

A Light on Past Lives: The Illuminating Effects of Electronic Resources on Biographical Research

"She Wields a Mighty Dashing Pen": Journalist Jane Cunningham Croly

Jane Cunningham Croly (Source: The Bohemian Brigade Website)

"She Wields a Mighty Dashing Pen": Journalist Jane Cunningham Croly

Exploring the Language of the Popular in Anglo-American Newspapers, 1833-1988

AHRC RESEARCH NETWORK – CALL FOR PAPERS

Principal Investigator Dr Martin Conboy, Department of Journalism Studies, University of Sheffield

Exploring the Language of the Popular in Anglo-American Newspapers, 1833-1988

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