primary sources


Evaluating Evidence: Primary Materials and the Lifelong Value of the Humanities (A Conversation with Professor Joanne B. Freeman)

Joanne B. Freeman, Professor of History and American Studies at Yale University, is a leading expert on early American politics and culture. In this video, the newest in our Scholars Speak series, Freeman describes the essential role that primary source materials have played in her own research. She also discusses the lasting benefits of studying the humanities.

 

The author of the award-winning Affairs of Honor: National Politics in the New Republic and The Essential Hamilton, Freeman is particularly well known for her expertise in dirty, nasty politics. Her most recent book, The Field of Blood: Congressional Violence and the Road to Civil War was a New York Times notable book of 2018, one of Smithsonian’s top ten history books of 2018, and a finalist for the Gilder Lehrman Lincoln Prize. A co-host of the popular American history podcast BackStory, her online course, “The American Revolution,” has been viewed in homes and classrooms around the world.


For more information about Readex newspaper databases, please contact Readex Marketing.

 

Evaluating Evidence: Primary Materials and the Lifelong Value of the Humanities (A Conversation with Professor Joanne B. Freeman)

‘Light Up Your College Classroom with Primary Sources’—A new eBook for librarians and faculty

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This unique 34-page eBook offers five original articles that offer fresh ways to captivate and inspire college students—all based on the authors’ actual classroom experience. Written for both librarians and faculty, each short article offers first-hand descriptions of the successful integration of primary sources into teaching activities at a range of academic institutions.

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The classroom uses of primary sources described in this new eBook have worked not only to introduce students to the experience of the past, but also to create deeper engagement with research activities that spark lively discussions and improve the teaching process.

 

‘Light Up Your College Classroom with Primary Sources’—A new eBook for librarians and faculty

Teaching Students the Craft of History: A Conversation with Professor Stephen Aron [Video]

A leading authority on the American frontier, Stephen Aron is professor of history at the University of California, Los Angeles. In this brief video, Aron tells why primary sources resonate with college students today. Allowing them to make their own discoveries and learn the craft of history, he says, is critical to training students to be educated human beings.

 


For more information on using primary sources in the classroom, please contact Readex Marketing.

Teaching Students the Craft of History: A Conversation with Professor Stephen Aron [Video]

Announcing “Undergrads Doing History: Using Digital Primary Sources to Motivate Students” – An Upcoming Webinar by Prof. Carl Robert Keyes

banner top.JPG“How can I better incorporate my own research into the undergraduate courses I teach?”

College and university professors grapple with this question every semester.  In this 45-minute webinar, Prof. Keyes will reveal how he adapted two digital humanities projects—drawn from his own research on advertising in early America—into classroom exercises that challenge students to actively “do” history rather than merely learn about the past.

Register to attend this and learn how to:

• develop alternative assignments that engage student interest yet also enhance skills associated with traditional essays

• improve information literacy by identifying and assessing primary sources and secondary sources

• create research projects based on extensive collections of digital primary sources

• avoid pitfalls when developing digital humanities projects for undergraduate students

The webinar will conclude with an open Q & A session, and all registrants will receive a link to the recorded session.

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Thursday, Oct. 26, 2017 at 2:00 pm Eastern

Announcing “Undergrads Doing History: Using Digital Primary Sources to Motivate Students” – An Upcoming Webinar by Prof. Carl Robert Keyes

Announcing the Readex 2017 ALA Breakfast Event: “A Nation of Immigrants and a History of Anti-Immigration”

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On Sunday, June 25, Readex will host a special breakfast presentation titled, “Give me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses…” Except Them: A Nation of Immigrants and a History of Anti-Immigration.” An open discussion will follow the talk by Prof. Paul Finkelman, a leading authority on American legal history, race relations and religious freedom.

About the Presentation

Americans take pride in being a nation of immigrants and a “melting pot.” But as early as the 1640s, some leaders in the American colonies were complaining about the “wrong” kind of immigrants. This timely talk lends historical perspective to current controversies with refugees, walls and executive orders.

Man ALA 2017 Breakfast Invite.jpgFinkelman will explore the long history of lamentable anti-immigration activity in the United States, including anti-Catholic political parties; “No Irish Need Apply” signs used by Boston businesses;  murderous attacks on Irish, Chinese, Italian, German and Jewish immigrants; and more. Various restrictions and laws limiting citizenship—as well as court decisions enforcing them—will be covered. And Finkelman will reveal how primary source materials in Readex collections can be used to dive deep into immigration history—a boon to students and scholars in history, sociology, political science, anthropology, literature, journalism, and ethnic studies programs.

Announcing the Readex 2017 ALA Breakfast Event: “A Nation of Immigrants and a History of Anti-Immigration”

‘Primary Sources Now: A Conversation with Professor David Goldfield’ [VIDEO]

Readex recently sat down with David Goldfield, the Robert Lee Bailey Professor of History at the University of North Carolina, Charlotte, and author of America Aflame: How the Civil War Created a Nation. In our short discussion, Goldfield described how his extensive study of U.S. religious and Southern history—including newspaper editorials, church sermons and other primary source documents—enabled him to identify a critically important aspect of the American Civil War not often discussed by other historians.

Professor Goldfield also explained why he uses digitized primary sources in his teaching to excite and engage students. Watch the interview to learn how online resources like The American Civil War Collection help students gain a wider view of history based on a variety of perspectives.

Contact us for more information about The American Civil War Collection or other primary source collections for classroom use.

‘Primary Sources Now: A Conversation with Professor David Goldfield’ [VIDEO]

Students Becoming Scholars: Using Digital Archives to Create a Powerful Primary Source Assignment [Webinar on Demand]

In a recent webinar, Dr. Julie Voss, Associate Professor, Department of English, Lenoir-Rhyne University, shared her experience using a digital archive of 18th-century books, broadsides and pamphlets to fascinate and challenge an undergraduate class of English majors. Using the Readex Early American Imprints collection, she asked her students to select an out-of-print text and then create an original modern edition of the work. Throughout this process, they experienced the joys and frustrations of working with rare old books, expanded their repertoire of research skills, and, in the end, began to see themselves as legitimate scholars.

Attendees told us they were hoping to:

  • Gain new ideas for engaging students in research using primary sources
  • Learn practical ways for using this kind of assignment in the classroom
  • Hear about collaboration between faculty and librarians

According to our follow up survey, their expectations were met!

“I especially appreciated learning new ways of assessing students’ knowledge. I knew a standard English research paper was not appropriate, but didn't know how to design a project.”

“Prof. Voss's project has given me ideas for expanding current student projects.”

And attendees left with ideas for implementing primary source research at their institutions:

“We look forward to expanding this project to include not only items from digital archive databases, but documents and manuscripts from our physical archives.”

Students Becoming Scholars: Using Digital Archives to Create a Powerful Primary Source Assignment [Webinar on Demand]

New Webinar! Students Becoming Scholars: Using Digital Archives to Create a Powerful Primary Source Assignment

Students Becoming Scholars: Using Digital Archives to Create a Powerful Primary Source Assignment

Presenter: Julie R. Voss, Associate Professor of English, Lenoir-Rhyne University

Voss webinar image.JPGA unique joy lies in the study of rare old books—the compelling promise of imaginative typefaces and yellowed pages, the intoxicating flow of the language, marginalia inscribed centuries before by an original reader, the thrill of making a fresh discovery. Most students aren’t aware of what can be found in their library’s rare book room; indeed, many never explore these revered repositories. But thanks to the magic of digitization, professors can easily share the delights of antiquarian works with their undergraduate students in powerful new ways. 

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New Webinar! Students Becoming Scholars: Using Digital Archives to Create a Powerful Primary Source Assignment

Using Primary Sources to Engage Students: An On-Demand Webinar

Presenter:

Debra Reddin Van Tuyll,

Professor, Department of Communications, Augusta University

 

Watch this new webinar to learn how primary sources introduce students to the experience of the past; create deeper engagement with research activities; and spark lively discussions that improve the teaching process.

 

 

Using Primary Sources to Engage Students: An On-Demand Webinar

New Webinar: Using Primary Sources to Engage Students

Learn how primary sources…

  • Introduce students to the experience of the past
  • Create deeper engagement with research activities
  • Spark lively discussions that improve the teaching process.

Getting some students excited about learning can be a daunting challenge. They’re often distracted by the current media environment. Primary sources, however, can transport them into a form of virtual-reality that gets them not only excited but also engaged with a topic. 

Day and Time:

Thursday, January 28, 2016 2:00 pm to 3:00 pm EST 

Presenter(s):

Debra Reddin Van Tuyll, Professor, Department of Communications, Augusta University 

 The objective in using primary sources—both print and material—is to put students into a virtual time machine that allows them to see, touch, feel, and even hear artifacts from earlier times. When teaching with primary sources—be it pamphlets printed by Benjamin Franklin or newspapers from the antebellum era—students’ eyes often widen and their attention becomes entirely focused on the topic at hand. 

Join us to discuss how to integrate primary sources into your teaching. Topics will include:

New Webinar: Using Primary Sources to Engage Students

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