pseudoscience


‘A warning to all wicked people”: Highlights from the newest supplement to Early American Imprints, Series II

Recently released material from Early American Imprints, Series II: Supplement 3 from the American Antiquarian Society, 1801-1819, includes these three exceptionally rare printed works: an illustrated book of children’s games, a handbook offering methods of clairvoyance, and a tale of the perils suffered by drunkards and blasphemers.


Youthful Sports (1802)

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In addition to its detailed images of carefree children at play, this imprint includes a warning to boys playing with weapons.

Bows and arrows are not so commonly in use as they were formerly, and when little boys get them, they are not always sufficiently careful how they use them. I knew a little boy who had one of his eyes shot out by an arrow, which his companion unthinkingly aimed at him. Those who are allowed to use the bow, ought to shoot at some mark, or at the trunk of a tree; but never at little birds, as it is very cruel to hurt harmless creatures.

Youthful sports Bow and Arrow.jpg

 

The discussion of cricket offers this heeding:

‘A warning to all wicked people”: Highlights from the newest supplement to Early American Imprints, Series II

‘The Most Excitable Senator’: Highlights from Afro-Americana Imprints, 1535-1922

The February release of Afro-Americana Imprints, 1535-1922: From the Library Company of Philadelphia includes examples of the use of pseudoscience to justify racism, a defense of Senator Sumner’s anti-slavery “Crime Against Kansas” speech, and more.


 

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Negroes and Negro Slavery (1853)

By John H. Van Evrie, M.D.

John H. Van Evrie (1814-1896) authored several books defending slavery and racism, edited the white supremacist newspaper Weekly Day Book, and owned a publishing company. He was referred to as the first professional racist in American history. Van Evrie often employed the pseudoscience of race biology to defend his beliefs, in this case his opposition to miscegenation.

‘The Most Excitable Senator’: Highlights from Afro-Americana Imprints, 1535-1922

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