Society of Early Americanists


Franklin scholar uses America’s Historical Newspapers to trace an ingenious hoax

Carla Mulford, Dept. of English, Penn State University

In December 2008 an essay about one of Benjamin Franklin’s cleverest hoaxes was published in The Proceedings of the American Philosophical Society. Written by distinguished Franklin scholar Carla Mulford, “Benjamin Franklin's Savage Eloquence: Hoaxes from the Press at Passy, 1782” was awarded the prestigious William L. Mitchell Prize from the Bibliographical Society of America on January 27, 2012. As explained in the Bibliographical Society's press release, Dr. Mulford’s article...

Source: Proceedings of the American Philosophical Association (Dec. 2008)

Franklin scholar uses America’s Historical Newspapers to trace an ingenious hoax

Materials and Methods in Early American Religion: A Society of Early Americanists Conference Roundtable

Panel Chair: Chris Phillips, Lafayette College Scholarly interest in early American religions has greatly expanded in recent years across a variety of disciplines. This panel is intended to generate discussion about how ideas about doing research on religious topics has changed, and how scholars can best use archives, both digital and physical, many of which are only newly available. The chair invites one-page proposals for 10-minute talks (not formal papers) from any field, including interdisciplinary studies. Possible questions may include: • What is a religious artifact? • What can we know from what we find in the archive? • How do issues of access (cataloging, access costs, research funding, etc.) inform or limit research in these areas? • What might the future relationship between digital and physical collections look like? • Do digital forms of research and delivery offer new paradigms for understanding religions? • How do contemporary notions of religiosity and secularity affect work on early American religion? • How do we deal with “gaps” in the archive? • What new paradigms or metaphors, beyond recovery, reconstruction, etc., might we use in studying this topic, especially in the context of women, children, and ethnic minorities? • What are the possibilities for studying the place of orality in American religions? How do we bring the study of religion to our students? Please send proposals to Chris Phillips, Assistant Professor of English, Lafayette College (phillipc@lafayette.edu) by September 20, 2010.
Materials and Methods in Early American Religion: A Society of Early Americanists Conference Roundtable

Back to top