Sports history


‘A warning to all wicked people”: Highlights from the newest supplement to Early American Imprints, Series II

Recently released material from Early American Imprints, Series II: Supplement 3 from the American Antiquarian Society, 1801-1819, includes these three exceptionally rare printed works: an illustrated book of children’s games, a handbook offering methods of clairvoyance, and a tale of the perils suffered by drunkards and blasphemers.


Youthful Sports (1802)

Youthful sports Title Page.jpg

In addition to its detailed images of carefree children at play, this imprint includes a warning to boys playing with weapons.

Bows and arrows are not so commonly in use as they were formerly, and when little boys get them, they are not always sufficiently careful how they use them. I knew a little boy who had one of his eyes shot out by an arrow, which his companion unthinkingly aimed at him. Those who are allowed to use the bow, ought to shoot at some mark, or at the trunk of a tree; but never at little birds, as it is very cruel to hurt harmless creatures.

Youthful sports Bow and Arrow.jpg

 

The discussion of cricket offers this heeding:

‘A warning to all wicked people”: Highlights from the newest supplement to Early American Imprints, Series II

“A Heart of Oak and Nerves of Steel”: A Look Back at Golf’s Greatest Upset and the Local Hero of the 1913 U.S. Open

This year's U.S. Open marked the 100th anniversary of one of golf’s most memorable moments: the incredible performance of a 20-year-old amateur in the same event in 1913. Francis Ouimet’s win—the most unexpected victory in golf and perhaps all sports—can be relived in the pages of America’s Historical Newspapers.
“A Heart of Oak and Nerves of Steel”: A Look Back at Golf’s Greatest Upset and the Local Hero of the 1913 U.S. Open

Librarian turned award-winning biographer hails research value of historical newspapers

Paperback publication date: March 1, 2012

Librarian turned award-winning biographer hails research value of historical newspapers

Baseball in America: Its Origins and Early Days

Some things never change, or so suggested the Duluth News Tribune in 1916:

Baseball in America: Its Origins and Early Days

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