First release of Ethnic American Newspapers now available for trial

Maximum Prepublication Discount Ends Soon

The first release of Ethnic American Newspapers from the Balch Collection, 1799-1971 is live, and this unique new resource is now available for institutional trial. Created from the newspaper holdings of the former Balch Institute of Ethnic Studies—arguably the best known ethnic research center in America—and the Historical Society of Pennsylvania, one of the largest and oldest family history libraries in the nation, this online collection will present more than 130 searchable newspapers, including many rare 19th-century titles.

Two centuries of immigrant life in the U.S.

First release of Ethnic American Newspapers now available for trial

Commodore Vanderbilt: Patriot or War Profiteer?

Post by T.J. Stiles, author of The First Tycoon: The Epic Life of Cornelius Vanderbilt (Knopf)

[Note: On April 7, 2011, the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation, as part of its 87th annual competition, awarded a Fellowship to T.J. Stiles based on impressive prior achievement and exceptional promise for future accomplishment. This article by T.J. Stiles appeared in the February 2010 issue of The Readex Report. Here he discusses his use of the Readex digital edition of the U.S. Congressional Serial Set in researching The First Tycoon, which won both a National Book Award and a Pulitzer Prize.]
Commodore Vanderbilt: Patriot or War Profiteer?

Law and Disorder: Urbana University Students Bring an 1857 Court Case to Life

 

Our guest blogger today is Julie Ann McDaniel, Librarian, Swedenborg Memorial Library,Urbana University 

Source: The Historical Marker DataBase

Mechanicsburg, Ohio is a really small place today—less than 2,000 people—so imagine what the population would have been in 1857. But this little community was the site of an event that lead to a federal court case to determine the constitutionality of the Fugitive Slave Act.

 

Many local students knew vaguely of the story of Addison White, a runaway slave from Kentucky. His master tracked him to Mechanicsburg and sent slave catchers to bring him back. No one expected the townspeople of Mechanicsburg to arrive with pitchforks and carpet beaters to chase the slave catchers away.

Law and Disorder: Urbana University Students Bring an 1857 Court Case to Life

Libyan Rebel Leaders in FBIS Daily Reports

Libyans Raise the Rebel Flag

Khalifa Bilqasim Haftar and Omar al-Hariri, two of the leaders of the reportedly somewhat disorganized military opposition to Col. Muammar Gaddafi in Libya, are not only mentioned in current news reports (see the Sunday, April 3, 2011, edition of The Washington Post), but also in the pages of translations produced and published in the 1980s and ‘90s by the U.S. Foreign Broadcast Information Service. Here are a couple of the dozens of reports on then Col. Haftar from the FBIS Daily Reports.  First, consider this March 28, 1988 report on Col. Haftar’s decision to join the anti-Gaddafi forces.

Libyan Rebel Leaders in FBIS Daily Reports

Remembering the Triangle Shirtwaist Company Fire on its 100th Anniversary

Photo credit: Courtsey of Kheel Center

The Triangle Shirtwaist Company was a business that made shirtwaists, the common term of the day for women's blouses. The business, owned by Max Blanck and Isaac Harris, was located on the eighth, ninth, and tenth floors of the Asch Building in New York City. Most of its employees were young women, mainly Italian and European Jewish immigrants. While the building was relatively modern and clean, the pay was low, the days were long, and working conditions were often dangerous. These factors combined to make the factory a classic example of a "sweatshop."  

Source: NYC 100 Years Ago

Remembering the Triangle Shirtwaist Company Fire on its 100th Anniversary

Select historical newspapers published in cities, states, regions or any combination

From Maine to California, the most comprehensive collection of U.S. newspapers published in the 18th, 19th and 20th centuries is America’s Historical Newspapers. Continually expanding, this unique online resource features thousands of historical newspapers published in more than 450 cities from Alaska to Florida. And now, you can create your own customized collection from all available titles published in any U.S. region, state, or city. Easily build a custom collection that meets your institution's budget America's Historical Newspapers Select is an essential tool for many types of historical research. Students and faculty can easily search any combination of titles within a single, easy-to-use interface, and when your institution’s needs expand, titles from additional locations can be added at any time. Consider any custom configuration, including: • Appalachian states • Coastal Colonial cities • Confederate States of America • Deep South • Ghost Towns • Great Plains • Maryland, Virginia, and Washington, D.C. • New Jersey, New York City and Philadelphia • New Orleans and Mobile • Rocky Mountain states • West Coast
Select historical newspapers published in cities, states, regions or any combination

Helen Keller—Child of Adversity, Woman of the World

From the Missouri Republican, Apr. 1, 1888. Click to open.

Helen Keller—Child of Adversity, Woman of the World

Special Prepublication Savings on FBIS Daily Reports, 1941-1974

From North Africa to the Middle East to South Asia and beyond

Since 1941 the U.S. Foreign Broadcast Information Service (FBIS) has been recording, transcribing and translating intercepted radio broadcasts from foreign governments, official news services, and clandestine broadcasts from occupied territories. Now a comprehensive digital edition of this unique archive is available for students and scholars of world history and political science. 

 

 The historical precedents to topics in today's headlines from Libya, Egypt and the Middle East

Special Prepublication Savings on FBIS Daily Reports, 1941-1974

Early Radio Broadcasting: Solving Mysteries with America's Historical Newspapers

[This article by Donna L. Halper, Assistant Professor of Communication at Lesley University, first appeared in the February 2011 issue of The Readex Report.]

Early Radio Broadcasting: Solving Mysteries with America's Historical Newspapers

Easy Access to Historically Significant U.S. Newspapers

A wide selection of diverse titles reveals local, regional and national history Dozens of significant titles from more than 40 states are available individually as a part of America’s Historical Newspapers. These American Newspaper Archives, many spanning two centuries, provide valuable perspectives and reporting on crucial conflicts from the Civil War to World War I to the Gulf War; movements ranging from women’s suffrage to civil rights; noteworthy citizens; local events; natural disasters; political campaigns; and much more. Featured titles:
Easy Access to Historically Significant U.S. Newspapers

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