Halloween Happenings in Historical Newspapers

For nearly 200 years, American newspapers have chronicled the evolution of the eve of All Saints Day from religious observance into night of devilish doings. Articles brim with accounts of prayers and prognostications, banshees and bar hopping, parties and property damage, tasty confections and rumors of hidden pins, poison and razor blades. Depending on perspective, the darkening days of late autumn represent either a time of fear and dread or a chance for fun and frivolity.
Halloween Happenings in Historical Newspapers

Exploring the Language of the Popular in Anglo-American Newspapers, 1833-1988

AHRC RESEARCH NETWORK – CALL FOR PAPERS

Principal Investigator Dr Martin Conboy, Department of Journalism Studies, University of Sheffield

Exploring the Language of the Popular in Anglo-American Newspapers, 1833-1988

New praise from abroad for the Readex Archive of Americana

Dr. Eran Shalev, Department of History, Haifa University and author of Rome Reborn on Western Shores: Historical Imagination and the Creation of the American Republic writes:
"I cannot tell you how much the Readex historical databases have helped me over the years in my research and writing. Early American Imprints and Early American Newspapers have become integral to the way in which I write and conceptualize. And the new Supplements from the Library Company will be another valuable addition to the Archive of Americana.
"As much as I cannot think of writing without a word processor, it is impossible for me to envision historical research before Readex's digital editions. These collections are especially crucial for scholars working from outside of the United States."
Have Readex digital collections been valuable for your own research or for research by students and faculty at your institution?  We want to hear from you!  Please comment below or write to dloiterstein@readex.com.
New praise from abroad for the Readex Archive of Americana

The United Nations as Teacher

Suppose there were an information source from which you could learn practically everything about how the world’s 191 countries operate?  What makes these global citizens tick?  Why do they do what they do? Why, for instance, did Saddam Hussein invade Kuwait in the first place?  And why did some military experts and historians compare that invasion to Hitler’s conquest of Czechoslovakia in 1938?  How did the 1994 civil war in Rwanda result in the massacre of half a million people?  What forces keep the Middle East in perpetual turmoil?
The United Nations as Teacher

Free Online Access to "The Black Press: Soldiers Without Swords"

Through the month of October, California Newsreel is providing Web access at no charge to “The Black Press: Soldiers Without Swords” – the first film to chronicle the history of African American newspapers. This award-winning documentary tells the little-known stories of the African American journalists and editors who for nearly 200 years “risked life and livelihood so African Americans could represent themselves in their own words and images.” Click here for free access to "The Black Press" during October. Among the topics discussed in the film’s first section, Too Long Have Others Spoken For Us, are the founding in 1827 of the first African American newspaper, Freedom's Journal; Frederick Douglass’s influential antislavery paper, The North Star; the beginnings of crusading journalism as exemplified by the work of Ida B. Wells, a pioneer in the struggle to end lynchings; and much more.
Free Online Access to "The Black Press: Soldiers Without Swords"

Rare FBIS Annexes now available online

FBIS Daily Report Annexes, 1974-1996 is an essential complement to FBIS Daily Reportsthe fully searchable broadcast and news resource featuring first-hand reporting from around the globe. This new international archive offers an additional 7,500 items, each designated "For Official Use Only" and previously unavailable outside the intelligence community and other Federal agencies. The Annexes were not an item in the Federal Depository Library Program, which distributed the Daily Report in microfiche from 1978 to 1996. No institution other than the Central Intelligence Agency holds all of the Annexes.
Rare FBIS Annexes now available online

The Police in Revolt? The Jails Open? Four Views of Mexico on November 25th, 1911

“The Police, in Revolt; the Jails, Open; the Nation, in Riot; the Families, in Dismay” – Thus runs the headline of Mexico’s El Diario on November 25th, 1911, as the Mexican Revolution raged in the capital.  As we celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month, it is both sobering and edifying to look back at the Revolution that shook Mexico a century ago, the reverberations of which would be felt across the Americas for decades.

From Latin American Newspapers. Click to enlarge.

It is especially edifying to look back at this revolution from the many perspectives that can be found in the newspapers of both Mexico and the United States. On the same day, November 25th, 1911, El Imparcial took a very different view of the situation—not surprisingly, as it was a propaganda organ of Mexico’s embattled dictator, Porfirio Diaz.

The Police in Revolt? The Jails Open? Four Views of Mexico on November 25th, 1911

New MARC Records for the U.S. Congressional Serial Set: September 2010 release

The latest release of MARC Records for the Serial Set cover the 99th and 100th Congresses, 19851988. These 4,119 new records have been posted to our Readex MARC Records portal. MARC records currently available include: American State Papers: covering the 1st through 25th Congresses (1789-1838): 6,278 records U.S. Congressional Serial Set: covering the 15th through the 100th Congresses (1817-1988): 363,637 records. For more information about Readex MARC Records, please call 800.762.8182 or email sales@readex.com.
New MARC Records for the U.S. Congressional Serial Set: September 2010 release

Newspapers: "the rough draft of history"

Paper: The State; Date: Dec. 5, 1905; Issue 5302; Page 1; Columbia, South Carolina

Newspapers: "the rough draft of history"

New issue of The Readex Report available

In the September 2010 issue: the dark descent of an American literary icon; using 19th-century government documents to right wrongs against Native Americans; and a private collector’s zeal adds depth and diversity to an eminent historical collection. From Mascot to Militant: The Many Campaigns of Seba Smith’s Major Jack Downing By Aaron McLean Winter, National Tsing Hua University Readers of the Washington, D.C. newspaper The Daily National Intelligencer witnessed a strange and disturbing transformation in 1847, when the nation’s most popular literary character freely admitted that he had become a greedy, cynical killer. Soon enough this beloved American hero, whose name was synonymous with Yankee Doodle, would threaten to stage a military coup to seize the Capitol and overthrow Congress!  Continued...
New issue of The Readex Report available

Pages


Back to top