American Pamphlets, Series 1, 1820-1922: From the New-York Historical Society
Now fully searchable…The most dominant print genre of the 19th-century
An enormous amount of unique and eclectic material related to ideas, events, institutions, and people of the time.
David Lincove, Professor, History, Political Science, Public Affairs & Philosophy Librarian, Ohio State University

Quick Facts

  • Pamphlets capture the diverse attitudes and opinions of often-neglected segments of society
  • More than 25,000 rare items capture a century of controversies, from slavery to suffrage
  • An exceptionally valuable and little-used record of American history, culture and contemporary life

Overview

Created to cajole, convince, inform and edify the American people on nearly every issue of the day, pamphlets have had a powerful impact on American life. As America’s population grew rapidly and printing costs declined, the use of pamphlets exploded in the 19th century. Revealing passionate views and perspectives not seen in other print genres, these rare items addressing slavery, suffrage and dozens of other divisive issues include speeches, orations, debates, sermons, treatises, tracts, narratives, poems, songs, memoirs, announcements, legal notices and more.

The under-explored views of overlooked segments of society
Now this unique online resource—produced from the New-York Historical Society’s extraordinary collection of pamphlets—provides more than 25,000 short works printed in every region of the United States. Key to the study of race, ethnicity and gender in the 19th and early 20th centuries, these pamphlets span 100 years of American life, from the Jacksonian Era through the dawn of the Jazz Age. Researchers will find outstanding coverage of contentious topics related to politics and government, religion and religious movements, art and entertainment, business and economics, health and medicine, education, immigrants and ethnic groups, American Indians, slavery and the Civil War, African Americans, Hispanic Americans, women, and science and technology.

Perspectives not found in books, periodicals or newspapers 
Pamphlets represent a genre of printed materials written by authors from an unusually large socio-economic range. Few Americans in the 19th century could afford to publish bound books; however, many more had the means to print pamphlets. As with broadsides and other ephemeral items, pamphlets are a hard-to-find class of primary source materials, rarely collected and catalogued. More so than the heavily researched more traditional print genres, they offer scholars and students in American history, culture and contemporary life fresh opportunities for insight into a wide spectrum of American society.

Awaiting discovery…a newly available record of the past
This invaluable collection of newly digitized pamphlets from one of the world’s leading historical societies will open up a new world of research materials for scholars and students in such disciplines as history, communications, political science, literature, sociology, gender and ethnic studies. Picking up where Early American Imprints ends, American Pamphlets, Series 1, 1820-1922 is fully integrated into America’s Historical Imprints for seamless searching with Afro-Americana Imprints, American Broadsides and Ephemera, and related collections.

About the New-York Historical Society
The New-York Historical Society, one of America’s pre-eminent cultural institutions, is dedicated to fostering research and presenting exhibitions and public programs that reveal the dynamism of history and its influence on the world of today. Founded in 1804, New-York Historical has a mission to explore the richly layered history of New York City and State and the country, and to serve as a national forum for the discussion of issues surrounding the making and meaning of history.

Image: Louis Lang, Return of the 69th (Irish) Regiment, N.Y.S.M. from the Seat of War, 1862-1863. Oil on canvas. Collection of the New-York Historical Society

Accolades

“Spanning more than 100 years, this collection of American pamphlets is a rich well of historical primary sources. Students and scholars will use these artifacts as focal points to illustrate larger social movements in the U.S. The direct appeals and strong opinions found in these scarce materials will spark interest and generate fresh interpretations and lively discussions.

“Pamphlets lend themselves to creative assignments like student-curated exhibits, in which students build context through further research. The ability to narrow searches by state is particularly valuable for connecting students to their local community's history and for teachers needing primary sources that connect with each state's unique curricular outcomes.”
— Priscilla Finley, Humanities Librarian, University of Nevada, Las Vegas

American Pamphlets, 1820-1922, represents an interdisciplinary treasure trove for students and faculty in a host of academic fields, including history, literature, political science, sociology, and anthropology. Providing a unique window into America's past, these pamphlets will be highly useful to researchers trained in the New Historicism, cultural studies, and other methods."
— Mark Kamrath, Professor of English, University of Central Florida

“Pamphlets were used as a relatively inexpensive way to distribute diverse opinions and wide-ranging information to a large number of people. This new digital collection of thousands of searchable pamphlets will appeal to a broad audience interested in American political, social, educational, religious, and cultural history between 1820 and 1922. Students and researchers will find an enormous amount of unique and eclectic material related to ideas, events, institutions, and people of the time.”
— David Lincove, Professor, History, Political Science, Public Affairs & Philosophy Librarian, Ohio State University

American Pamphlets, 1820-1922, a new Archive of Americana module, is an amazing collection of a highly desirable genre for research and teaching. Pamphlets are wonderful, cross-disciplinary primary sources. They are short, to the point and have their biases exposed. They reveal a great deal about the society of a time and a place, and many in the later 19th century include interesting illustrations as well. This newly digitized collection, beginning with Series 1 from the New-York Historical Society, will be heavily used. Faculty will employ them in the classroom, undergraduates will find them surprisingly accessible, and graduate students will mine them for their masters’ theses and dissertations.”
— Donna McCrea, Head of Archives & Special Collections, History Librarian / Associate Professor, University of Montana-Missoula

Notable Titles

A Selection of Notable Pamphlets Organized by Subject

Politics and Government

General Committee of Independent Republican Young Men of the City and County of New-York. Standing Rules & By-Laws of the General Committee of Independent Republican Young Men of the City and County of New-York. New-York: Printed by W. Applegate, 257 Hudson Street, 1834.

Brooks, Erastus. The controversy between Senator Brooks and "+John," Archbishop of New York: growing out of the speech of Senator Brooks on the church property bill, in the N.Y. State Senate, March 6, 1855. New York: De Witt & Davenport, [1855].

Roosevelt, Robert Barnwell. Is Democracy Dishonesty? Are Four Men to Rule New York with a Rod of Iron? Is the Popular Voice to be Stifled at the Ballot-box?: Speech of Hon. Robert B. Roosevelt, Delivered at the Municipal Reform Meeting, Held at Cooper Union, in the City of New York, Sept. 4, 1871. New York: Journeymen Printers’ Co-operative Association, 1871.
• Concerns Tammany Hall corruption

Rogers, Edward H. Eight hours a day’s work: a lecture. Boston: Printed at the Office of the "Weekly American Workman" [1872].

Swinton, John. The Tompkins Square Outrage: Appeal of John Swinton, Addressed to the Legislature, Through the Committee on Grievances, and Delivered in the Assembly Chamber at Albany, March 25th, 1874. [Albany, N.Y.?: s.n., 1874].
• Refers to an incident of police brutality in New York

Post, Louis Freeland. Our despotic postal censorship. Chicago: Public Publishing Company, [1906].
• Discusses the Post Office ban on Lucifer, the light-bearer, a newspaper

Religion and Religious Movements

Hole in the Wall, or a Peep at the Creed-Worshippers. [Philadelphia?: s.n.], 1828.
• Reveals the contentious religious debates in early nineteenth-century America

Hicks, Elias, 1748-1830. Notes of a Discourse, Delivered at the Rose-Street Meeting-House, on the Fifth Day of April, 1829. New-York: Printed and published by Elliot & Palmer, 1829.
• A pamphlet by the controversial Quaker Elias Hicks

Infidel Society for the Promotion of Mental Liberty. The Meteor of Light, Containing the Minutes and Proceedings of the Infidel Convention, Held in the City of New York, May 4th, 5th and 6th, 1845. Boston: Printed by J.P. Mendum, 1845.
• A rare anti-religious tract

An appeal to the Christian public, on the evil and impolicy of the church engaging in merchandise: and setting forth the wrong done to booksellers, and the extravagance, inutility, and evil-working, of charity publication societies. Philadelphia: King & Baird, 1849.

Bible Argument: Defining the Relations of the Sexes in the Kingdom of Heaven. [Oneida, N.Y.?: s.n., ca. 1850]. 
• Lays out the doctrines of the Oneida Community regarding sexual practices

New York (State). Laws of the State of New York Relating to Religious Incorporations Compiled by Lockwood Lawrence and Crosby, Esqs. New-York: N.S. Parkhurst, stationer and printer, 1855. 

Proceedings of a Meeting in Relation to St. Ann's Church for Deaf-mutes: Wednesday, May 19, 1858.  New-York: George F. Nesbitt & Co., printers and stationers, corner Pearl and Pine Streets, 1858. 
• Inscribed "N.Y. Historical Society from Thomas Gallaudet".

Treat, Joseph. God, religion, and immortality: an oration, delivered at the Paine celebration in Cincinnati, Sunday, January 29, 1860. Cincinnati, O.: Published by the Committee, 1860. 
• An atheist, rationalist speech delivered in Cincinnati in 1860.

Chase, Moses. The End. Vision which Moses Chase saw in 1849. [Baltimore: s.n., 1861?]. 
• A Mormon prophecy of the Civil War

Cradlebaugh, John.  Utah and the Mormons: Speech of Hon. John Cradlebaugh, of Nevada, on the Admission of Utah as a State, Delivered in the House of Representatives, February 7, 1863.  [Washington?: L. Towers & Co., 1863?]. 
• Argues against the admission of Utah as a state, and includes graphic descriptions of the Mountain Meadows Massacre to support this argument

Magie, David. A Sermon Preached on the Occasion of the First Occupation of the Westminster Presbyterian Church, Elizabeth, New Jersey, Sunday, December 29, 1867. New-York: Francis Hart, 1868. 

Andrews, C. W. (Charles Wesley). On the Incompatibility of Theater-going and Dancing with Membership in the Christian Church: an Address of the Clergy of the Convocation of the Valley of Virginia, to the People of their Respective Parishes. Philadelphia: Office of Leighten Publications, 1872. 

The American Battle of Dorking: America in 1980. [New York: s.n., ca. 1874]. 
• The anonymous author, inspired by British writer George Tomkyns Chesney’s Battle of Dorking, prophesizes that, by the year 1980, the United States will be a Catholic state under Papal authority.

Business and Economics

Fisk, Theophilus. The Banking Bubble Burst, or, The Mammoth Corruptions of the Paper Money System Being Relieved by Bleeding: Being a History of the Enormous Legalized Frauds Practised Upon the Community by the Present American Banking System. Charleston, S.C.: Printed and published at No. 63 Wentworth Street, 1837. 
• Concerns the financial panic of 1837

A System of Credit For a Republic and the Plan of A Bank for the State of New-York. Albany: Printed by Packard and Van Benthuysen, 1838. 

Prospectus of the Shooters Island Petroleum Refining & Storage Co., Richmond County, New-York. New-York:George F. Nesbitt & Co., printers and stationers, 1865. 
• Shooters Island, off the northwestern shore of Staten Island, is currently a wildlife sanctuary, though it was once home to an oil refinery.

The Resumption of Specie Payments and the Funding of Public Debt. New York: Lange, Hillman & Lange, 1869. 

Rosecrans, William S. Mexico. [United States: s.n., 1870]. 
• Discusses establishing a national banking system for Mexico and is accompanied by a leaflet stating that “Residence in Mexico enabled me fully to know her condition, and put me in good relations with the political parties of that country…”

Tyler, Daniel F. How to Get Rich! Written for Poor Men, and Young Beginners of Life, by their Affectionate Friend Uncle Ben, Who Was Once in Both These Conditions, but is Now in Neither. New York: Charles M. Cornwell, steam book and job printer, 1871. 

Farming Near Home, or State Legislation Against Hard Times, Being Suggestions for an “Act” to Facilitate the Settlement of Land, the Promotion of Agriculture, Civilization and Co-operation, and for the Relief of Labor and Capital Within the Boundaries of the Older States. [United States]: Published by R.J. Wright, [1878?]. 

Education

Private Commercial Mathematical and Classical Study, Corner of Smith and Livingston Streets, Brooklyn, of W.F. Walker, A.M. New-York: Pudney & Russell, printers, no. 79 John-Street., MDCCCLII [1852]. 

Some Facts About our Public School System: an Address Delivered at the Twenty-third Annual Meeting of the New York State Association of School Commissioners and City Superintendents, Utica, Feb. 19, 20, 21, 1878. [New York (State)?: s.n.], 1878. 

Short Unit Syllabus for Special Naturalization Classes in Evening Elementary Schools (tentative). New York: Stillman Appellate Printing Co., 1922. 

Immigrants and Ethnic Groups

Archibald, John. On the Contact of Races Considered Especially with Relation to the Chinese Question. San Francisco: Towne & Bacon, book, card and fancy job printers, 1860. 

Horatio Seymour als Staatsmann und Patriot (The War-Record of a Democratic Statesman and Patriot). New York: Druck der "New Yorker Staats-Zeitung," [186-?].
• A German-language pamphlet printed in New York

Proceedings of the First National Convention of the Fenian Brotherhood: Held in Chicago, Illinois, November, 1863. Philadelphia: James Gibbons, printer, 333 Chestnut Street, 1863. 
• The Fenian Brotherhood was an Irish republican organization, founded by immigrants in 1854.

Lieber, Francis, 1800-1872. Lincoln oder McClellan?: an die Deutschen in Amerika. [Philadelphia: King & Baird, 1864]. 
• Pamphlet directed at German voters in the 1864 presidential campaign

A Chinese Enterprise: No. 40 East 14th Street. [New York: s.n., 1870?]. 
• Advertising brochure for a Chinese physician in New York, with illustrations

Moss, William R. Making Americans, How and Why: Addresses by a Lawyer, William R. Moss, Chairman, Committee on Americanization, the Chicago Association of Commerce, an Educator, Peter A. Mortenson, superintendent, Public Schools of Chicago.  [Chicago?: s.n., 1920?]. 
• A pamphlet on the education of immigrants

Friends of Irish Freedom. National Council. Friends of Irish Freedom: policy adopted December 29, 1920: the following resolutions were, on motion of Hon. Daniel F. Cohalan, unanimously adopted at the meeting of the National Council, Friends of Irish Freedom, held at New York, December 29, 1920. New York City: Allied Printing Trades Council, [1921?]. 

American Indians

Ross, William P. (William Potter).  Early Creek History: Speech of Hon. William P. Ross at the Tullahassee Manual Labor Boarding School, July 18th, 1878. [Muskogee, Creek Nation, Indian Territory, Okla.]: Office of the Indian Journal, [1881?]. 

Armstrong, Samuel Chapman.  Indian Education in the East, at Hampton, Va., and Carlisle, Penna., an Address Delivered in Boston, Mass., October, 1880. Hampton, Va.: Normal School Steam Press, 1880. 

Coombs, S. F. (Samuel F.) Dictionary of the Chinook jargon: as spoken on Puget Sound and the Northwest, with original Indian names for prominent places and localities with their meaning: historical sketch, etc. Seattle, Wash.: Lowman & Hanford Stationery & Print. Co., [1891?]. 

Bull, William L. A Friendly Criticism on the Attitude of the Indian Rights Association Towards White Settlers in Relation to the Indians, and Especially to the Utes, of Southwestern Colorado. [Colorado?: s.n., 1893]. 

Slavery and the Civil War

Pinckney , Charles Cotesworth. An address delivered in Charleston: before the Agricultural Society of South-Carolina, at its anniversary meeting, on Tuesday, the 18th August, 1829. Charleston: Published by order of the Society, printed by A. E. Miller, no. 4, Broad Street, 1829. 
• A justification for slavery and the treatment of those enslaved.

Proposals for Forming a Free Produce Company, in the City of New-York. New-York: W. Applegate, printer, 257 Hudson-street., [1832?]. 
• A proposal by several Quakers in New York to create a store house for produce grown by means other than slave labor

Ohio. General Assembly. Joint Select Committee on the Colored Population of Ohio.  Report of the Committee on the Colored Population of Ohio: Mr. Worthington, from the Select Committee on the Colored Population of Ohio, made the following report... [Ohio?: s.n., 1833?]. 
• Unrecorded pamphlet on fugitive slaves in Ohio

American Anti-Slavery Society. Examination of Mr. Thomas C. Brown, a Free Colored Citizen of S. Carolina, as to the Actual State of Things in Liberia in the Years 1833 and 1834, at the Chatham Street Chapel, May 9th & 10th, 1834. New-York: S.W. Benedict & Co., 1834. 
• Interview offers insight into the lives of American immigrants to the early Liberian republic

Republican Committee of Seventy-six. The Northern Man with Southern Principles, and the Southern Man with American Principles: or, A View of the Comparative Claims of Gen. William H. Harrison and Martin Van Buren, Esq., Candidates for the Presidency, to the Support of Citizens of the Southern States. Washington [D.C.]: Printed by Peter Force., 1840. 

Hill, Pascoe Grenfell. Fifty Days on Board a Slave-Vessel in the Mozambique Channel. In April and May, 1843. New York: J. Winchester, New World Press, [1844]. 

Cook, John E. (John Edwin). Confession of John E. Cook, Brother-in-Law of Gov. A.P. Willard, of Indiana, and One of the Participants in the Harper's Ferry Invasion, Published for the Benefit of Samuel C. Young, a Non-Slaveholder, Who is Permanently Disabled by a Wound Received in Defence of Southern Institutions. Second edition. [Charlestown, W. Va.?: s.n.], c1859. 

Elliott, James Habersham. The Bloodless Victory, a Sermon Preached in St. Michael's Church, Charleston, S.C., on Occasion of the Taking of Fort Sumter. Charleston: printed by A.E. Miller, No. 3 State-Street., 1861. 

United States of America. State of New-York, ss. By This Public Instrument, Be It Known To All Whom the Same Doth or May Concern, That I [blank] a Public Notary ... Do Hereby Certify … That [blank] Black Man, Mariner … Is a Free Man and Citizen of the United States of America ... [New York: s.n., not after 1863]. 

Conway, Thomas W. Report on the Condition of the Freedmen, of the Department of the Gulf, to Major General N.P. Banks, Commanding, by Chaplain T.W. Conway, U.S.A, Superintendent Bureau of Free Labor. New Orleans: H.P. Lathrop, printer, 1864. 

Bancroft, George. Oration Pronounced in Union Square, April 25, 1865. [New York: Schermerhorn, Bancroft & Co., 1865].
• Speech that movingly conveys the nation’s sorrow at the death of Abraham Lincoln

Mandeville, Sumner.  Sermon by Rev. S. Mandeville, Delivered at the House of Peter R. Sleight, LaGrange, Dutchess County, December 10, 1865, on the Occasion of the Burial of the Remains of 1st Lieut. David B. Sleight (late of Co. I, 150th reg., N.Y.S.V.) Who … Was Killed in Action Near Averysboro, N.C., While Gallantly Driving the Enemy, March 16th, 1865. Poughkeepsie, N.Y.: Platt & Son, printer, 1865. 

Davis, Noah.  New York Soldier's Home: its Necessity, its Proposed Inmates, and the Progress of the Work. New York: B. Stradley, printer, 1877. 
• Provides valuable information about the establishment of soldiers’ homes after the war, and about war work in general

African Americans

Frost, D. S. Funeral sermon of Lieut. A.L. Sanborn, 1st Reg’t U.S. Colored Troops, murdered at Norfolk, Va., by Dr. D.M. Wright, July 11, 1863: preached at Thetford, Vt., Dec. 8, 1863. [Vermont?: s.n., 1863?]. 
• Includes letters from Anson L. Sanborn to his mother, p. 13-14

South Carolina. General Assembly. A Bill to Establish and Regulate the Domestic Relations of Persons of Color, and to Amend the Law in Relation to Paupers, Vagrancy and Bastardy.  [South Carolina: s.n., 1865]. 
• Preliminary text of South Carolina’s black codes.  Includes manuscript corrections and notes.

Aldridge, Joshua. Resolute and Earnest Action. [New York: s.n., between 1865 and 1872]. 
• A political pamphlet written during Reconstruction by an African American New Yorker and the brother of Ira Aldridge, the famous Shakespearean actor of the European stage

Colored National Labor Convention (1869: Washington, D.C.).  Proceedings of the Colored National Labor convention: Held in Washington, D.C., on December 6th, 7th, 8th, 9th and 10th, 1869. Washington, D.C. Printed at the Office of the New Era, 1870.

Cox, Samuel Sullivan. Economy—Education—Mixed Schools: Speech of Hon. S.S. Cox, Member of Congress from New York City, on the Education and Civil-Rights Bills, Delivered Jan. 13, 1874 ... Washington: Government Printing Office, 1874.  

Douglass, Frederick. Frederick Douglass, on the Exodus. [United States: s.n., 1879?].  
• Contains a series of resolutions submitted by Douglass at a meeting in Hillsdale, Washington, D.C., in 1879. Cf. Blight, David. Frederick Douglass' Civil War.

Henderson, Joseph White. The Colored Man and the Ballot. Oakland, Cal.: Henderson and Humpfrey, 1888. 

Spanish-Language Imprints

Madan, Cristóbal F. Contestacion a un Folleto Titulado: Ideas Sobre la Incorporacion de Cuba en los Estados Unidos, por Don José Antonio Saco. [New York]: Imprenta de "La Verdad", Calle de Nassau, no. 102, [1849]. 
• Early Spanish-language pamphlet printed in New York

Allo, Lorenzo. La Esclavitud Domestica en sus Relaciones con la Riqueza: Discurso Pronunciado en el Ateneo Democratico Cubano de New York, en la Noch del 1o. de Enero de 1854. New-York: Oficina tipográfica de J. Mesa, Calle Ann, no. 21, 1854. 
• A Spanish language discussion of slavery in Cuba, printed in New York.

Channing, William Ellery. La Esclavitud. Nueva York: Juan M. Davis, impressor, Calle de Pearl no. 207, 1864. 
• Spanish translation of Channing’s classic work, Slavery, printed in New York. Translator’s note at end shows the work’s relevance to slavery in Cuba.

Women

Watkins, N. Female Preaching Defended by N. Watkins, Minister of the Primitive Methodist Church, Albany, to Which is Added, a Sermon by Miss R. Watkins. Albany: Printed for the subscribers, 1832. 

The lady’s self-instructor in millinery, mantua making and all branches of plain sewing: With particular directions for cutting out dresses, etc. New York: Burgess, Stringer, & Co., 1844. 

Austin, Harriet N. Tracts of the National Dress-Reform Association. No. 1. [United States: s.n., 1851?]. 
• Advocates shorter skirts and more loosely constructed garments for women as conducive to greater health and freedom of movement.

Woman’s Rights Convention (1855: Boston, Mass.). Reports on the Laws of New England, Presented to the New England Meeting Convened at the Meionaon [Boston], Sept. 19 and 20, 1855. [Boston?: s.n., 1855?]. 

Blackwell, Elizabeth. Address on the Medical Education of Women. New York: Baker & Duyckinck, 1856. 
• Blackwell, the first woman to earn an M.D. in the United States, notes the importance of making medical education, especially hands-on instruction, available to aspiring female physicians.

Ward, Henry Dana. Programme of the Young Ladies’ Institute, 38 West Twenty-Third Street. New-York: Printed by D. Fanshaw, corner Nassau and Ann-Streets, 1857. 
• Offers valuable details about the curriculum at a girls’ school in the middle of the nineteenth century

Ingersoll, Henrietta Crosby. A Woman's Plea for Partial Suffrage. [Washington, D.C.?: s.n., 186-?]. 
• Interesting early suffrage pamphlet.

Hillside Seminary (Montclair, N.J). Catalogue and Circular of Hillside Seminary, a Family Boarding School for Young Ladies, Montclair, New Jersey. New York: Francis & Loutrel, steam printers and bookbinders, 1862. 
• Includes lists of current students and alumnae

Hamilton, Gail. A Call to My Countrywomen. [United States: s.n., 1863?]. 
• Provides insights into the participation of women in the discourse about the Civil War

St. Saviour’s Sanitarium (New York, N.Y.). St. Saviour's Sanitarium, Inwood-on-the-Hudson: a Home for the Care of Women Addicted to the Excessive Use of Alcohol or Drugs, Incorporated in 1892, and Under the Charge of the Sisters of St. Mary of the Episcopal Church. [New York: s.n., not before 1892]. 

Health and Medicine

Medical Society of the State of New York (1807- ). A System of Medical Ethics Published by Order of the State Medical Society of New-York.  New-York: Printed by William Grattan, 3, Thames-Street, 1823. 

Sargent, Lucius M. A Brief Epistle from Dr. Ziba Sproule: Respectfully Addressed to Ladies of the Upper Ten Thousand, and the Millions Below, Widows, Wives, and Mothers, Sisters, Cousins, and Maiden Aunts. [United States: s.n., 1855?]. 
• Anti-tobacco tract. Notes that cancer of lip and tongue may be linked to smoking.

Johnson, A., Dr.  The Family Dentist: Being a Summary of Hints and Suggestions Highly Important to all Persons, but Especially so to Parents and Others Having the Management of Children. New York: J. McLoughlin, 1856. 
• Manual by a dentist whose practice was located at 73 East Twelfth Street in New York.

New York Infirmary for Women and Children. The New-York Infirmary for Women and Children, 64 Bleecker Street, Corner of Crosby. New York: D. Fanshaw, printer, [1856 or 1857]. 
• A work contributing to our understanding of the history of public health in New York

Hudson, Erasmus Darwin. Mechanical Surgery: Artificial Limbs, Apparatus for Resections, Apparatus for Ununited Fractures, Feet for Limbs Shortened by Hip Disease, Arms and Hands. New York: Baker & Godwin, printers, [1867?]. 

Slimmins, Elihu. The Alpha and Omega of Bathing: Inspired, Respired and Transpired at Angell's Turkish Baths, 61 Lexington Avenue, Cor. Twenty-fifth St., N.Y. [New York]: T.F. Leslie & Co.’s typography, 335 B’dway, [1872]. 

Baldwin, Simeon Eben. The Natural Right to a Natural Death. [St. Paul, Minn.: s.n.], 1899. 
• A pamphlet on the ethics of death and dying

New York (State). Dept. of Health. Sleeping and Sitting in the Open Air, Issued by the New York State Department of Health. Albany: New York State Department of Health, [1917?]. 
• Concerns the treatment of tuberculosis

New York League for Americanism. The public health is menaced: organized physicians, dentists and druggists point to danger that lurks in Davenport compulsory health insurance bill: public health service would be crippled, medical professions demoralized, the people enslaved by huge political machine and excessive taxation ...Syracuse, N.Y.: New York League for Americanism, [1919]. 

Science and Technology

Hopkins, George F. Observations on electricity, looming, and sounds; together with a theory of thunder showers, and of west and north west winds. To which are added, a letter from the Hon. Thomas Jefferson, and remarks by the Hon. Samuel L. Mitchill. New-York: Printed and sold by Hopkins & Morris, No. 9, Nassau-street., 1825. 

Henry Rawls & Co. Catalogue of Philosophical Apparatus Illustrative of the Physical Sciences … Manufactured and Sold by Henry Rawls & Co., no. 57 State Street, Albany. Albany: Printed by J. Munsell, 1839. 

Pennington, John H. A System of Areostation, or Steam Aerial Navigation. Washington City, D.C.: Printed at the Index Office, 1842. 

James, Charles T. A lecture on the comparative cost of steam and water power, delivered at Hartford, Conn.—Feb. 1844. Newburyport [Mass]: Printed by Morss and Brewster, 1844. 

Tallmadge, James. Address of Gen. James Tallmadge Delivered at Castle Garden in the City of New York at the Close of the Twentieth Annual Fair of the American Institute. New York: R. Craighead, Printer, 1847. 

Vergnes, Maurice. Electricity Considered in its Application to Motive Power. New York: John F. Trow, printer, 1857. 

Shaw, R. Tennent. Flax and Hemp Cotton: Communication of R. Tennent Shaw to Hon. J.K. Morehead, of Pennsylvania, [Hon.] William M. Bailey, of Rhode Island, [Hon.] John A. Warder, of Ohio, Appointed by Hon. Isaac Newton … to Award the $20,000 Appropriated by the Last Congress, to Discover a Sure and Safe Process of Cottonizing Flax and Hemp as a Substitute for Cotton. New York: Chas. A. Mignard, printer, 1864. 
• An attempt at producing a substitute for Southern cotton during the Civil War; includes a sample of the material.

Pleasonton, A. J. On the Influence of the Blue Color of the Sky in Developing Animal and Vegetable Life: as Illustrated in the Experiments of Gen. A. J. Pleasonton, Between the Years 1861 and 1871, at Philadelphia. Philadelphia: Inquirer Book and Job Print, 1871. 
• Printed on blue paper, with a blue wrapper.

The New Atomic, or Steam Coal-Gas Manufacture for Light and Heat. Philadelphia: James Crutchett, 1878. 
• Relates to the application of new technologies in nineteenth-century America.

Electric Light, its Dangers, to Owners of Real Estate. [New York: s.n., 1881]. 

Dickerson, Edward N. Joseph Henry and the Magnetic Telegraph: An Address Delivered at Princeton College June 16, 1885 by Edward N. Dickerson. New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1885. 

American Society of Civil Engineers. A Few Notable Engineering Works in New York City. [New York: s.n., 1905 or 1906]. 
• Booklet consists of 22 illustrations of notable buildings, bridges, and other structures of the period.

Art and Entertainment

Remarks Upon the Athenæum Gallery of Paintings, for 1831 August 17. [Boston]: I.R. Butts, printer, [1831]. 

Welcome to Charles Dickens: the Boz Ball, to be Given Under the Direction of a Committee of Citizens of New York, at the Park Theatre, on the Evening of the Fourteenth of February Next. New York: J.C. House, printer, 1842. 
• Accompanied by a printed invitation to the ball, and a ticket for a dinner in Dickens' honor at the City Hotel, February 18th, 1842

Moreheid, J. N. Lives, Adventures, Anecdotes, Amusements, and Domestic Habits of the Siamese Twins. Raleigh, N. C. Printed and published by E.E. Barclay, 1850. 

Barnum, P. T. (Phineas Taylor). Illustrated Memoir of an Eventful Expedition into Central America: Resulting in the Discovery of the Idolatrous City of Iximaya … and the Possession of Two Remarkable Aztec Children, Maximo (the Boy), and Bartola (the Girl) … New York: Wynkoop, Hallenbeck & Thomas, printers, 1860. 
• Fictitious account written by P.T. Barnum.

History of Charles Nestel, Surnamed Commodore Foote, and Joseph Huntler, Surnamed Colonel Small, the Two Smallest Men Living. [New York]: 1862. Torrey Brothers, printers, 13 Spruce Street, New York., [1862].

Gerry, Elbridge T. The Mumler "Spirit" Photograph Case: Argument of Mr. Elbridge T. Gerry, of Counsel for the People, Before Justice Dowling, on the Preliminary Examination of Wm. H. Mumler, Charged with Obtaining Money by Pretended "Spirit" Photographs. New York: Baker, Voorhis & Co., 1869. 

Barnum, P. T. (Phineas Taylor). Admiral Dot, the smallest man in the world. ...: with P.T. Barnum’s Great Traveling Museum, Menagerie, Caravan and Hippodrome. [New York?: s.n.], 1874. 

Association Copies

Sharpless, John T. (John Townsend). Description of the American Wild Swan: Proving it to be a New Species, Cygnus Americanus. [United States?: s.n.], 1832. 
• Audubon’s copy, inscribed "J.J. Audubon, Esq., London".

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