Georg Mauerhoff


About Author: 
Georg joined NewsBank’s News Division in 2002, transitioning to Readex academic library sales two years later. Previously he worked in Manhattan and Toronto, selling pre-press imaging solutions to magazine, book and catalog publishers. He graduated from Case Western Reserve University with an MSLS (Information Science).
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Testing Convictions: The Power of Readex in the Classroom

Teresa Van Hoy is Associate Professor of History at St. Mary’s University in San Antonio, Texas. Originally from North Carolina, Prof. Van Hoy moved to Texas to research the intersecting histories of Latin America and the United States. Over the past year she has made extensive use of Readex digital collections in her classroom. Recently Van Hoy shared her thoughts on the impact these collections had on her students:

I have discovered an unexpected outcome of access to Readex databases. I knew they boosted the quality of student research and facilitated our teaching of research skills. But something more powerful turned out to be happening. It was a phenomenon more subtle than the pedagogical objectives I had so long been measuring and celebrating.

What was happening? Students' dearest convictions were being tested. Their deepest sense of what the Alamo means or the prestige of the Texas Rangers or the commitment of Texas to slavery or the presumed triumph of the end of Reconstruction or the role of San Antonio in the Mexican Revolution was tested by their swift and independent access to America’s Historical Newspapers.

Testing Convictions: The Power of Readex in the Classroom

Published by Authority: The Boston News-Letter, 1704-1776

The Boston News-Letter was the first continuously published newspaper in the British Colonies of North America, surviving for 72 years.  It appeared 13 years after the one and only issue of America’s first multi-page newspaper, Publick Occurrences Both Forreign and Domestick, was published in 1690. Established more than 300 years ago, the Boston News-Letter was first published and printed on April 24, 1704, by John Campbell and Bartholomew Green, respectively. The News-Letter was noted for its pro-British sympathies, and the words “published by authority” appeared on its front page.

Also of note was the News-Letter’s coverage of the movements of pirates during what we now refer to as the “Golden Age of Piracy” (1650s to 1730s). This information often came from firsthand accounts related to publisher Campbell by sailors arriving in the port of Boston. And there were many such accounts, including numerous mentions of Edward “Blackbeard” Teach. Perhaps of most interest among them would be the news of Blackbeard’s sensational death. This item, which describes his 1718 decapitation in hand-to-hand combat on-board ship, was published in the News-Letter dated Monday February 23, to Monday March 2, 1719.

Published by Authority: The Boston News-Letter, 1704-1776

“Stings for Our Enemies—Honey for Our Friends”: The Washington Bee (D.C.)

A weekly African American newspaper, the Washington Bee was often the boldest of the several dozen papers published in the District of Columbia in the decades before and after the turn of the 20th century. The Bee’s slogan was “Stings for Our Enemies—Honey for Our Friends.”

Throughout its nearly 40 years in publication, it was edited by African-American lawyer-journalist William Calvin Chase. Despite the Bee’s alignment with Republican Party views, Chase did not hesitate to criticize GOP leaders when he thought they were on the wrong side of an issue. Among the Bee’s daring editorial stands was Chase’s criticism of Booker T. Washington’s conservative positions on black racial progress.

The Bee focused much of its editorial coverage on the activities of the city’s African Americans, and its society page paid special attention to events at local black churches. The paper also covered national issues using its own correspondents as well as wire services. Financial troubles brought an end to the paper in 1922, a year after Chase’s death.

African American Newspapers, 1827-1998, features 1,926 issues of the Bee published between 1882 and 1922. These digitized issues may be browsed by way of the “Newspaper Titles” tab, and searches can be restricted to this newspaper by limiting results to the Washington Bee.

“Stings for Our Enemies—Honey for Our Friends”: The Washington Bee (D.C.)

The first illustrated African American newspaper: The Indianapolis Freeman

Called “the Harper’s Weekly of the Black Press” by historian Irving Garland Penn, the Freeman was the first illustrated African-American newspaper. It was founded in Indianapolis, Indiana, in 1888 by Edward C. Cooper. Subsidized by the Republican Party for some of its existence, the Freeman enjoyed large circulation because of the variety and scope of its news coverage and its attention to black culture.

When its correspondents weren’t covering issues and events of interest to African Americans across the nation, the Freeman focused on the actions of past black figures. Many (including two that follow) were illustrated on the Freeman’s front pages in the late 19th-century. Political cartoons and photographs appeared in later years.

Edward Marshall, a favorite tenor in New York, is featured on the front page of the Freeman, November 30, 1889.

The Hon. John M. Langston, Congressman-elect from the Fourth District of Virginia, is featured on the front page of the Freeman, April 6, 1889.

The first illustrated African American newspaper: The Indianapolis Freeman

Archive of Americana transports you through time into 18th- and 19th-century America

As a Readex account executive, I enjoy the opportunity to help bring our digital collections to the attention of students and scholars at some of the smallest four-year colleges. Occasionally, this extends to working collaboratively with librarians and faculty. Among my accounts is Washington College on Maryland’s Eastern Shore. At this liberal arts institution known for its strong commitment to undergraduate education, I consulted closely with Ruth Shoge, Associate Professor, College Librarian, and Adam Goodheart, Director of the College’s C.V. Starr Center for the Study of the American Experience, among others, to help bring the acclaimed Archive of Americana collections to their campus.
Archive of Americana transports you through time into 18th- and 19th-century America

The More Things Change: Selected U.S. Congressional Serial Set Documents, 1983

Twenty-seven years ago, the government publications listed below were published in the U.S. Congressional Serial Set. They came from the 1st Session of the 98th Congress, 1983. When I scan the titles of these publications, I have to wonder whether they really were published that long ago because the issues are just as relevant today, if not more. Here are a half dozen that strike me as particularly timely:

What changes are most needed in the procedures used in the United States justice system? (Serial Set II Vol. No. 13497 98th Congress, 1st Session S.Doc. 5 945 p. 1983)

Should producers of hazardous waste be legally responsible for injuries caused by the waste? (Serial Set II Vol. No. 13527 98th Congress, 1st Session H.Doc. 93 594 p. 1983)

Emergency mathematics and science education act. (Serial Set II Vol. No. 13533 98th Congress, 1st Session H.Rpt. 6 121 p. February 17, 1983)

The More Things Change: Selected U.S. Congressional Serial Set Documents, 1983

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