Brett Kolcun


About Author: 
Brett joined Readex in 2008. He is responsible for product management of Archive of Americana collections, including product enhancements, new product development, product planning and sales support. In addition, he is the Director of Readex’s ETC program, which provides product enhancements, additional content and webinar training to Readex customers.
Posts by this Author

Personal Research Management tool now available in America's Historical Newspapers

 

Create a Personal Folder.jpg

This summer Readex updated its America's Historical Newspapers interface by adding a time-saving Personal Research Management tool. This practical new functionality has been designed to improve and speed up the user research workflow through two key features. Users can now save specific searches as well as specific articles to a personal folder within the interface, ensuring the availability of their saved articles and searches every time they access the database.

Annotation 2019-08-13 102632 2.jpg

The Readex Personal Research Management tool also includes not only an all-new automatic citation generator but also improved functionality for downloading documents and emailing saved articles. In short, users of America’s Historical Newspapers will now spend less time managing and organizing their workflow and more time on research and writing.

Annotation 2019-08-13 102905 3.jpg


To learn more about the Personal Research Manager, please contact Readex Marketing.

Personal Research Management tool now available in America's Historical Newspapers

Announcing Image Viewing Enhancements for America’s Historical Newspapers and America’s Historical Imprints

On September 12, 2016, America’s Historical Newspapers and America’s Historical Imprints were updated with new features that improve image viewing and reading. These features include a larger image screen, a navigation box for easy scrolling, full-screen viewing capability (meaning a user can expand the image to fit the entire screen, on any device), and improved magnification tools. These enhancements provide a more powerful and effective reading and viewing experience for researchers.

Image Viewer image.jpg

Features like the table of contents, email, download, citation export, and more, are all still available. Nothing has been taken away from users, and much has been improved.

With the new image viewer, students and researchers will find the reading and viewing of images to be easier and more enjoyable, and their time spent on research will be more productive.

The enhanced image viewer is one of many improvements made to Readex interfaces over the past year. In mid-2015 Readex launched new interfaces for America’s Historical Newspapers, America’s Historical Imprints, and World Newspaper Archive. The new interfaces offer stronger graphics (appealing especially to students) and improved navigation. In February 2016, Readex launched Readex AllSearch, a new platform that lets users search across all Readex collections at once.

Announcing Image Viewing Enhancements for America’s Historical Newspapers and America’s Historical Imprints

The Letter from Birmingham Jail: Martin Luther King, Jr. and the Tradition of Nonviolence

In April of 1963, Martin Luther King, Jr. was arrested for participating in a series of demonstrations against racism and segregation in Birmingham, Alabama. At the time of his arrest, King had come under criticism for focusing his efforts on fighting racial inequality in the streets rather than in the courts. During this time, King wrote a letter defending the marches and sit-ins as a means to fight racism and injustice.

In his “Letter from Birmingham Jail,” King argued that not only was civil disobedience justified in challenging unjust laws, but that resistance to injustice was a moral obligation deeply rooted in Western traditions. Considered one of the most important documents in American history, the “Letter from Birmingham Jail” not only expresses King’s personal articulation of non-violence as a means to resist unjust laws, but also the spirit of opposition to injustice that is part of the American progressive tradition.

The Letter from Birmingham Jail: Martin Luther King, Jr. and the Tradition of Nonviolence

Researching the March on Washington using African American newspapers and periodicals

This month we celebrate the 50th anniversary of the 1963 March on Washington during which Martin Luther King, Jr. made his famous “I Have a Dream” speech. Calling for an end to racism, the speech was a defining moment in the American Civil Rights Movement. With reference to the Emancipation Proclamation of 1863, King recounted the travails of African Americans over the previous 100 years as they struggled against bigotry and segregation. In it King also provided a vision of a future free of intolerance where people would be judged not by the “color of their skin,” but by the “content of their character.”

 

Researching the March on Washington using African American newspapers and periodicals

"Native Son" Serialized with Illustrations in African American Newspapers during 1942

One of the most significant pieces of African American literature, “Native Son,” was serialized in the Kansas Plaindealer, Arkansas Free Press and other African American newspapers in 1941-42. These newspaper re-printings of Richard Wright’s novel featured powerful drawings by pioneering African American cartoonist Oliver Harrington. Revisit Wright’s groundbreaking work about institutional racism and its impact on the individual in the illustrated pages of the Plaindealer, as found in America’s Historical Newspapers.

"Native Son" Serialized with Illustrations in African American Newspapers during 1942

Women's Suffrage: The Frontier Background

"Spirit of the Frontier" by John Gast (1872)

Women's Suffrage: The Frontier Background

Instant Access to our Award-Winning Civil War Collection Still Available

From The Daily Picayune; 04-15-1865; New Orleans

One hundred and forty-five years ago this month, two of the most critical events in American history occurred within five days of one another. On April 9, General R. E. Lee surrendered the battered Army of Northern Virginia to Union forces under the command of General Ulysses S. Grant. Five days later, President Abraham Lincoln was shot by John Wilkes Booth and died the next day. Learn about these events and many more in The Civil War: Antebellum Period to Reconstruction—a Choice 2010 Outstanding Academic Title.

Instant Access to our Award-Winning Civil War Collection Still Available

Back to top