Washington Crosses the Delaware River: A Unique Christmas Tradition

Washington Crossing the Delaware (1851) by American painter Emanuel Gottlieb Leutze (Source: Metropolitan Museum of Art)

No Christmas celebration would be complete without Santa Claus, carols and George Washington. Wait, George Washington? What does he have to do with Christmas, you might ask? Well, quite a bit if you live near the site where General George Washington and his soldiers crossed the Delaware River on Christmas night in 1776. Each year at Pennsylvania’s Washington Crossing Historic Park, a group of dedicated Revolutionary War re-enactors and history enthusiasts gather to recreate Washington’s famous Christmas-night river crossing. The participants brave the cold dressed in authentic reproduction clothing and use replicas of the same kind of boats Washington and his men would have used. This year will mark the 234th anniversary of their daring crossing and pivotal victory the next day at the Battle of Trenton.

Washington Crosses the Delaware River: A Unique Christmas Tradition

An Undergraduate's Reflections on Original American History Research: How Online Access to Historical Newspapers Helped Prepare an Award-Winning Tea Party Study

 [This post by David Brooks, a recent graduate of Taylor University, first appeared in the November 2010 issue of The Readex Report.]

An Undergraduate's Reflections on Original American History Research: How Online Access to Historical Newspapers Helped Prepare an Award-Winning Tea Party Study

A Light on Past Lives: The Illuminating Effects of Electronic Resources on Biographical Research

[This post by James McGrath Morris, author of Pulitzer: A Life in Politics, Print, and Power (HarperCollins, 2010), first appeared in the November 2010 issue of The Readex Report.]

A Light on Past Lives: The Illuminating Effects of Electronic Resources on Biographical Research

Explore Our Newest Resources at the American Library Association Midwinter Conference

Learn more about new Readex collections for 2011, including African American Periodicals from the Wisconsin Historical Society, 1825-1970, by visiting us next month in San Diego at NewsBank booth 2432. To explore the recently released resources below, please either stop by our booth or email us today at sales@readex.com. New in 2010 America’s Historical Imprints, 1639-1900 Now supplemented with 2,000 documents from the Library Company of Philadelphia, this single new interface for five related collections features over 100,000 early American books, pamphlets and other rare printed materials. FBIS Daily Report Annexes, 1974-1996
Explore Our Newest Resources at the American Library Association Midwinter Conference

The End of an Era: The Final Voyage of Space Shuttle Discovery

The 1988 return to flight launch of the Space Shuttle Discovery (Source: NASA Images)

The highly anticipated launch of space shuttle Discovery later this month will mark the beginning of an end. The United States’ era of launching manned space vehicles is almost over, or, at least, nearing a lengthy pause.  Following the final Discovery launch, only one remaining shuttle mission is planned. After that, government funding looks likely—but not definite—for one more launch.  Once the space shuttles are retired, the U.S. will relinquish its position as one of three countries with manned flight capability; only China and Russia will continue to have the capability to launch manned space vehicles.  The shuttle program kicked off a novel concept in space flight: reusable space vehicles. No longer would single-use rockets carry man and machinery into the final frontier. Instead, a craft capable of take off (albeit propelled by external fuel tanks), maneuverability in space, and re-entry and landing would revolutionize the industry. 

The End of an Era: The Final Voyage of Space Shuttle Discovery

Newest Issue of The Readex Report Now Available: November 2010

In this issue: how digitized newspapers shine a brilliant light on past lives; the profound impact of religion on African-American identity; the Boston Tea Party as perceived by both Colonialists and those loyal to the Crown; and the humor, hype and horror behind the mysterious minced pie. A Light on Past Lives: The Illuminating Effects of Electronic Resources on Biographical Research By James McGrath Morris, author of Pulitzer: A Life in Politics, Print, and Power (HarperCollins, 2010) American Mystery Meat: Unriddling the Mince Pie
Newest Issue of The Readex Report Now Available: November 2010

Searching for Ancient Dead in the Modern Age

Our guest blogger today is SJ Wolfe, Senior Cataloguer at the American Antiquarian Society and Independent Mummyologist 

SJ Wolfe and 19th-century mummy Padihershef

Searching for Ancient Dead in the Modern Age

Meddlesome Medals?

What do the following seven people have in common: Osagyefo Kwame Nkrumah, Peter Ayodele Curtis Joseph, Modibo Keita, Shafie Ahmed el-Sheikh, Samora Machel, Agostinho Neto, Sam Nujoma and Nelson Mandela?  Well surely many things indeed.  For example, if you said they were all important African leaders in the second half of the twentieth century, you would be correct.  Each, however, in addition to any other commonalities, received the Lenin Peace Prize—the Soviet Union’s counterpart to the Nobel Peace Prize. Articles and radio broadcasts monitored, translated, and published in the Foreign Broadcast Information Service (FBIS) Daily Reports discuss the Lenin Peace Prize awards.  By searching on the phrase “Lenin Peace Prize” and limiting results to items from Africa, one gets 22 results in the Readex digital edition of FBIS Daily Reports and Annexes, 1941-1996. Searching for “Lenin Peace Prize” in the Readex database without limiting results by location retrieves some 268 results. Here is one example from the Accra Ghana Domestic Service on how the award was perceived in that country in 1962.
Meddlesome Medals?

Ships Ahoy! They don't make ships like this anymore

From America's Historical Newspapers

Contrary to this newspaper report that the event would take place in November 1797, the frigate USS Constitution was actually christened and launched at Boston’s naval shipyards the previous month on October 21—213 years ago this fall. During the course of the next two weeks in 1797, a number of newspapers wrote or republished articles about the launching, including the Norwich Packet:

From America's Historical Newspapers (Click image to read full article.)

Ships Ahoy! They don't make ships like this anymore

The Short-Lived Republic of West Florida: A Tale of Deception and Intrigue

Map Credit: Courtesy of the Special Collections Department, University of South Florida. Digitization provided by the USF Libraries Digitization Center.

The Short-Lived Republic of West Florida: A Tale of Deception and Intrigue

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